Everything looks a bit soft

MrRise

Senior Member
Russian
I've encountered watching Peppa Pig the adjective soft, using in this sentence:

Context: Daddy Pig has poor sight, so he need to weak his glasses to see clearly, and the narrator talks us: But when Daddy Pig takes his glasses off... he can't see clearly. Everything looks a bit soft and fuzzy.

And if fuzzy means to see blurry, (right?) then how can be soft here? Just because soft is a.. for example my pillow is soft, as my toy bear is. Soft sight?

Source: Peppa Pig season 1 series 15 [00:55] time.
 
  • MrRise

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Most things have outlines - at the edge of the object, simply defining where the object is. Those that don't, such as clouds, would be described as having soft edges anyway:)
    So soft can mean the objects without clearly seeing outlines (=edges)? If so, in the sentence above fluzzy used as well. What's the difference between them? Because I think they linked somehow.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    So soft can mean the objects without clearly seeing outlines (=edges)? If so, in the sentence above fluzzy used as well. What's the difference between them? Because I think they linked somehow.
    Everything is out of focus - so edges are now soft and everything is fuzzy. The combination of the two words is partly for emphasis and the meanings do overlap:)
     
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