ex. = for example?

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JulianStuart

Senior Member
English (UK then US)
Until I joined this forum, I had never seen Ex. used in place of e.g. or for example. Now, most (perhaps all) of the times when I notice it, it has been contributed by a member whose native language is not English. I conclude that it is in some textbooks for teaching English as a second/nth language. Have any native English speakers had experience with this as an abbreviation for "for example"?
 
  • chamyto

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    My mother tongue is not English and I have always written e.g . meaning "for instance/ for example ".
    E.g. ,comes from Latin ( exempli gratia )
    I don´t know if the abbrevation of "exemplum" ( in Latin ) is ex
     

    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    No, as native English speakers we are so thoroughly accustomed to "e.g." that there is no thought of using anything else. I wonder if it has been adopted in ESL/EFL materials because it is a more obvious abbreviation. Having said that, it is used in my Japanese textbooks which are aimed at English speakers (they are published in Japan though).

    Still, it seems to me that it would be as wise to explain "e.g." at the beginning and get it over with, as learners are going to come across it pretty quickly outside of their learning materials.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    I have seen 'ex.' in (academic) publications from continental Europe - sorry, I can't remember exactly where. I've also seen 'cp.' or 'cfr' (for 'compare' rather than the usual 'cf.') and 'a.s.o.' (instead of the usual 'etc.').
     

    Ramanath Sahai

    New Member
    India - Hindi & English
    Re: "Ex." meaning "for example"' RH Websters Unabridged Dictionary treats it as an abbrev.
    ex.
    1. examination.
    2. examined.
    3. example.
    4. except.
    5. exception.
    6. exchange.
    7. excursion.
    8. executed.
    9. executive.
    10. express.
    11. extra.

     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Thank you Ramanath and welcome to the forum.

    I had found lots of things in various dictionaries for ex both as a word and as an abbreviation (Websters needs to add Natalisha's exercise to their list :D ) but my question was specific to the use of Ex. meaning for example instead of e.g., the more common abbreviation among native English speakers/writers.
     

    SteveLalancette

    New Member
    French - Canada
    It's the abbreviation used in French (and possibly other languages). I don't think they teach the use of this abbreviation in English classes, manuals or courses, it's just that people not familiar with English will assume it works in English as well and use it instead of e.g. because they're not aware of e.g.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    It's the abbreviation used in French (and possibly other languages). I don't think they teach the use of this abbreviation in English classes, manuals or courses, it's just that people not familiar with English will assume it works in English as well and use it instead of e.g. because they're not aware of e.g.
    Thanks - that would ex:eek:plain the observations perfectly:D
     
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