Examen profesional solicitado por el pasante, Mr. Joe Doe

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toniga

Senior Member
Mexico, Spanish
Hi again!

I am translating an Academic Transcript from Spanish to English. My problem is that in Mexico we call "pasante" to a University Student that has completed all the academic curriculum,has a letter to prove it ("carta de pasantia"), but is about to be examined in order to get his/her degree= "titulo".

I have found a translation as "assistant" = "asistente", which would correspond to someone who "helps"/assists a teacher / professor, but still a student(Freshman / sophomore). No good.

In English, "Graduate" is someone who has already been granted a degree="titulo". In Mexico "graduado" means that he has finished college, but has not received a degree="titulo". When someone gets a degree then he/she is a "graduate"= "titulado".

Can you help me? :eek:
 
  • GenJen54

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Hola toniga,

    This is really tough. I think part of our problem is the difference in the two systems. In the US, at least, students complete all of their coursework, take their "final" exams, which are part of their "regular" coursework, and then "graduate." At this point, they are considered "graduates." The only difference is with law or medical students. A law student or medical student can "graduate," from their coursework, but they still have to take their bar/board exams, which are administered by the state, in order to become licensed as either a lawyer or doctor.

    Would "licensed" work in this case?

    Someone who continues past the Bachelor Degree (first four years of college) and begins work on a Master's Degree is called a graduate student. These students have not necessarily taken any other exams to complete school, just to get in graduate school.

    As you noted, "assistants" are students (usually "graduate students") who are working on their Master's Degrees but help teach lower level classes. This would not work in your case.

    Are you trying to gain admission into a US or British university? You could say something like, "coursework completed," "degree pending final exam." Neither is one word.

    I'm sure others will be around to shed some more light on the situation.
     

    toniga

    Senior Member
    Mexico, Spanish
    GenJen54 said:
    Hola toniga,

    This is really tough. I think part of our problem is the difference in the two systems. In the US, at least, students complete all of their coursework, take their "final" exams, which are part of their "regular" coursework, and then "graduate." At this point, they are considered "graduates." The only difference is with law or medical students. A law student or medical student can "graduate," from their coursework, but they still have to take their bar/board exams, which are administered by the state, in order to become licensed as either a lawyer or doctor.

    Would "licensed" work in this case?

    Hi GenJen54:

    See, this document is a long one issued by the state university authorities, it explains that he has completed the coursework, includes the academic transcript and states that the ("examinee" would be a good word, wouldn't it?) has been before the Board and "defended/sustained" his thesis successfully, therefore the board gives him a grade/mark, makes him swear a kind of Hippocrates Oath; everybody in the Board signs the document and that means that he is licensed as a Physician.

    The other problem I have is that the name of the Title in Mexico is "Medico Cirujano Partero". I am translating it as "Physician Surgeon and Midwife"; the word "midwife" sounds a little weird. He is not yet a gynecologist (this is a postgrade), though. Do you know if "Physician" by itself would include the whole d... thing?

    The sentence "Afterwards, the President of the Board ´had the examinee take the Oath, (would it be correct?) as follows:'.Do you solemnly swear ..."
     

    toniga

    Senior Member
    Mexico, Spanish
    Hi, Everybody:

    I am still fighting with the translation of the certificate.

    Once the Examinee said "Yes, I do" to the Oath, then he is asked : " Si asi lo hiciere...". Can this be translated as "May you do so (??), then your conscience and the comunnity may reward or otherwise demand (exigir?) from you.."

    Thank you again
     

    mitigate

    Member
    Ireland, English & Irish
    In Ireland, when a student has completed and passed all his exams, but has yet to be officially awarded his degree, he is called a graduand.

    So, on passing all your exams for your degree, you might receive a letter from the university addressed "Dear Graduand" and telling you the date of your graduation. Once you have received your degree (graduated) you are then a graduate.

    You will not have to defend a thesis or anything though during the graduation though! It is purely ceremonial!

    Instead of "examinee", the "candidate" (as in, the degree candidate, professional qualification candidate etc) might be a good alternative.
     

    Liramusy

    Member
    Mexico, Spanish
    Hello,

    What would be the translation in US English for "Graduand" (in Ireland) or "Pasante" in mexican spanish??

    Thanks!
     

    Juan Carlos Garling

    Senior Member
    Spanish Chile/Argentina
    Hi again!

    I am translating an Academic Transcript from Spanish to English. My problem is that in Mexico we call "pasante" to a University Student that has completed all the academic curriculum,has a letter to prove it ("carta de pasantia"), but is about to be examined in order to get his/her degree= "titulo".

    I have found a translation as "assistant" = "asistente", which would correspond to someone who "helps"/assists a teacher / professor, but still a student(Freshman / sophomore). No good.

    In English, "Graduate" is someone who has already been granted a degree="titulo". In Mexico "graduado" means that he has finished college, but has not received a degree="titulo". When someone gets a degree then he/she is a "graduate"= "titulado".

    Can you help me? :eek:
    I guess that I understand what you mean by un pasante (Sp.) ein Passant (German), both accepted terms.

    The way I know it it's one who, as part of his curriculum and before graduating, must have a short period of practice = una pasantía (say one month or longer) in some activity related to his specialty, either in a private or public entity, usually for only a token pay. A certificate = carta de pasantía will be extended at the end of this field experience.

    Thus a student of agriculture will work at a farm, a student of law with a lawyer and one of architecture with an architect. A medical student may work at a hospital. Goverments often sponsor exchange of pasantías between countries also for graduates.

    This practice must certainly exists in USA and UK, so somebody may help you.
     

    Liramusy

    Member
    Mexico, Spanish
    Thanks everyone!!

    internship = practicas profesionales
    intern = practicante

    Pasante (in Spain)= Intern

    Pasante (in Mexico) =completed his studies and still has to write a thesis or take his orals..

    What would be the translation in English for "pasante" (in mexican Spanish)??
     

    parhuzam

    Senior Member
    USA/English/Español
    What we have is a " candidate" ...and other terms would be...... post graduate, masters candidate, Phd candidate.
    These are for the Humanities... Sciences and Law may have separate designations.
    Saludos.
     
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