except that

mimi2

Senior Member
vietnam vietnamese
Hi,
Is "except that" a best choice in this case?
"Except that he was good at physics in lower grades, he was terrible at it in grade 12."
Thanks.
 
  • tomandjerryfan

    Senior Member
    English (Canada)
    Not really. "Except that" means something like "if it were not for the fact that..." I would use "despite" instead.

    "Despite he was good at physics in the lower grades, he was terrible at it in grade 12."
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Hello Mimi2,

    It's not idiomatic, and I'm not really sure what you intend by the sentence. Could you offer us a paraphrase please?


    If you mean to say that–
    1. He was terrible at physics in grade 12 and
    2. He had been good at physics in the lower grades

    you might try this:

    Despite being good (or...having been good) at physics in the lower grades, he was terrible at it in grade 12.
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Hi,
    Is "except that" a best choice in this case?
    "Except that he was good at physics in lower grades, he was terrible at it in grade 12."
    Thanks.

    No, I think what you want, Mimi, is "Although he was good at physics in the lower grades, he was terrible at it in grade 12".

    I'm trying to think of a good example of using "except that"... I'll get back to you.
     

    tomandjerryfan

    Senior Member
    English (Canada)
    No, I think what you want, Mimi, is "Although he was good at physics in the lower grades, he was terrible at it in grade 12".

    I'm trying to think of a good example of using "except that"... I'll get back to you.

    How about:

    He was good at physics in every grade except grade 12.
    He was good at physics, except he didn't make it through grade 12.
     

    Judica

    Senior Member
    AE (US), Spanish (LatAm)
    I would only use "except that" in this type of sentence:

    "I didn't tell him anything, except that I needed the money"

    To use the phrase in a manner to mean "other than" it would be "except for".

    Except for the fact he was ....
     

    mimi2

    Senior Member
    vietnam vietnamese
    Thank you very much.
    I understand what you explained to me but the problem is that I have to choose these words:
    a. when b.while c. except that d. despite
    I chose (b) but the book says (c) so I am very confused.
    Is (b) correct? Please.
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    How about:

    He was good at physics in every grade except grade 12.
    He was good at physics, except (that) he didn't make it through grade 12.

    Those are okay, TJF - I was just trying to think of a phrase which begins with "Except that" as Mimi's does and, frankly, I can't. As Judica said, we would likely more commonly use "Except for" at the beginning of a sentence but that doesn't work in Mimi's context either.
     

    cruxcriticorum

    Senior Member
    United States, English
    Hi mimi2.

    You could say something like: "Except for being good at physics, he was terrible at academic subjects." It's a different meaning, though. When you use "except," you are excluding part of something. "The lower grades" is not a part of "grade 12." "Physics" is a part of "academic subjects." The previously mentioned rewordings (although, despite, etc.) are going to work better. I hope this helps.
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Thank you very much.
    I understand what you explained to me but the problem is that I have to choose these words:
    a. when b.while c. except that d. despite
    I chose (b) but the book says (c) so I am very confused.
    Is (b) correct? Please.

    If you have to replace this word for word, you'd be correct going with b., Mimi. You could use d. but would then have to add "being" as Cuchu suggested. By the way, it would be helpful if you'd provide us with the options you were given to start with and then we could probably help more quickly.:)
     

    Judica

    Senior Member
    AE (US), Spanish (LatAm)
    Thank you very much.
    I understand what you explained to me but the problem is that I have to choose these words:
    a. when b.while c. except that d. despite
    I chose (b) but the book says (c) so I am very confused.
    Is (b) correct? Please.

    Yes (b) would be the best choice. It looks like you may be studying conjunctions. Even so, "Except that" is not the correct one for the sentence. ... its horrific grammar, IMO.
     

    mimi2

    Senior Member
    vietnam vietnamese
    Hi,Dimcl.
    I am sorry about that and I will do as you said the next time.
    However, I have learned a lot about how to use "except that" in this thread.
    I thank you very much for all your kind help.
     
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