Exceptions to reduced relative clause

Discussion in 'English Only' started by wordsalad, Jun 1, 2014.

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  1. wordsalad

    wordsalad Senior Member

    New York
    English - US
    The relative pronoun and the verb in the following sentence cannot be removed. Why?

    Daily Mail says:
    A soldier who was almost killed in Afghanistan is vowing to return to Army service despite his serious injuries.

    When who was is omitted, the relative clause who was almost killed is reduced to a past participle clause almost killed. I think it still makes sense to me, though.

    A soldier almost killed in Afghanistan is vowing to return to Army service despite his serious injuries.

    The following sentences are in a similar construction and who was killed is reduced to killed. Is there an exception to the rule?

    Shields Gazette says:
    A soldier almost killed in a horrific rocket attack in Afghanistan is mentally and physically preparing himself for life as one of the rarest bionic men in history.
    KMSP-TV says:
    A soldier killed in Afghanistan when a man in an Afghan uniform fired on NATO troops was an American, a US defense official said Thursday.
    WBRZ says:
    A soldier killed in Afghanistan returned home for the last time Tuesday morning.
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2014
  2. Smauler Senior Member

    Ipswich, Suffolk, England
    British English
    "A soldier almost killed in Afghanistan is vowing to return to Army service despite his serious injuries."

    That's fine.
     
  3. bennymix

    bennymix Senior Member

    Ontario, Canada. I grew up in US.
    English (American).
    Wordsalad, is there a rule you believe applies? Have you seen a rule which you believe you have a counterexample for? Please state.
     
  4. wordsalad

    wordsalad Senior Member

    New York
    English - US
    bennymix, I don't know any rules to apply but I do believe it can be omitted as long as it works. I have a counterexample that someone says it can't, as in my first sentence, because reducing it makes the clause adverbial.
     
  5. Loob

    Loob Senior Member

    English UK
    Who says that, wordsalad?
     
  6. wordsalad

    wordsalad Senior Member

    New York
    English - US
    Someone who doesn't like its omission says that.
     
  7. Loob

    Loob Senior Member

    English UK
    I don't understand why you're being so coy about the identity of the "someone".:confused:

    In any event, the "someone" is wrong, as other posters have said.
     
  8. Biffo Senior Member

    England
    English - England
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2014
  9. Loob

    Loob Senior Member

    English UK
    If you're the "someone" wordsalad's referring to, Biffo, then I'm even more confused about why she wouldn't tell us:(.

    That said, there's a considerable difference between the thread you've linked to and the examples wordsalad has listed in this thread. Wordsalad's examples here all contain restrictive relative clauses; the earlier thread was about a non-restrictive relative clause.
     
  10. wordsalad

    wordsalad Senior Member

    New York
    English - US
    I didn't know the thread Biffo was linking to. My friend brought me an example I quoted in my question and asked me if "who was" can be omitted.

    After reading the earlier thread, I'd like to restate my question. Is there a rule that a non-restrictive relative clause cannot be modified if the reduced clause is considered adverbial? I'm not sure if I can tell which one uses a non-restrictive relative clause.
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2014
  11. Cagey post mod (English Only / Latin)

    California
    English - US
    Please give us an example sentence containing the kind of relative clause you are thinking of.
     
  12. wordsalad

    wordsalad Senior Member

    New York
    English - US
    The first sentence in my question was:
    A soldier who was almost killed in Afghanistan is vowing to return to Army service despite his serious injuries.

    The sentence in question from the other thread that Biffo linked to was:
    My friend who was almost killed in WWII saved my life yesterday.

    Which one contains a non-restrictive relative clause, in which case the reduced clause is adverbial and therefore omission of "who was" should be avoided?
     
  13. Cagey post mod (English Only / Latin)

    California
    English - US
    Neither of those clauses is non-restrictive.

    Please see the explanation under the definition of
    restrictive in our current dictionary.
    See also the previous threads listed below the definition.

    See also:
    Reduced adverbial clause
    Reduced Adverbial Clause with the verb to be
    Reduced Adverbial Clauses- Having consulted.. and checked...
    tenses and reduced adverbial clauses

    If a question remains after reading the above definition and looking over the above threads, you may add it to any suitable existing thread.

    I am closing this thread, as the discussion has drifted from the original question.

    Cagey,
    moderator.
     
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