exercise/drill

  • houshdaran

    Banned
    persian
    these are two sentences in two different paragraphs.

    one reads "student should reinforce these excercises....."
    the other reads "the best way to teach tactics is through drills........."
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Thank you ... but I'm still failing to understand your original question -- What's the difference between solving drills and solving exercises? -- in light of these questions.
     

    pops91710

    Senior Member
    English, AE
    It is hard to tell when the context is so little. Are we talking about a military school? To drill and to exercise have different meanings from each other.
    Please be a little more forthcoming with the context.
     

    houshdaran

    Banned
    persian
    It is hard to tell when the context is so little. Are we talking about a military school? To drill and to exercise have different meanings from each other.
    Please be a little more forthcoming with the context.
    no, it is a class for chess coaches
     

    Erkin D

    Member
    Turkish
    Well, what I understand from the word "drill" is like working out to get better in sportive and physical actions. Exercise could be anything, though. I guess it has a much larger meaning. Am I not correct?
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    For me, an exercise can be a one-time thing, while drills are repeated. In the definitions below, you can see the singularity of the first definition (a set task, a military drill) and the repetitive nature of the second:

    exercise: an activity carried out for a specific purpose: an exercise in public relations.
    ■ a task set to practise or test a skill.
    ■ a military drill or training manoeuvre.

    drill: training in military exercises.
    ■ instruction by means of repeated exercises.
     

    pops91710

    Senior Member
    English, AE
    no, it is a class for chess coaches
    I see. Well it is too bad you won't add to the context as requested. So I will wing it from here:
    A drill is intense repetitious training.
    The dictionary says:
    a. Disciplined, repetitious exercise as a means of teaching and perfecting a skill or procedure.
    b. A task or exercise for teaching a skill or procedure by repetition: conducted an air-raid drill; a drill for learning the multiplication tables.

    An exercise can be a practise run or lesson, usually never as intense and not ever repetitious.
     
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