Exercise Test or Practical Test for the SAT

Amber_1010

Senior Member
Chinese-Cantonese
Hello everyone!

If I'm a teacher in a North American High School, and my grade 12 students are taking the SAT next month, and I'm creating a Practical test for them to prepare them for the SAT.
When I title the test, do I type:
1. Grade 12 Exercise Test for SAT
2. Grade 12 Practical Test for SAT

Are they both fine? Is it an AE/BE difference?
I think so. I think 1 is BE and 2 is AE.

Is that so?
Thank you!
 
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  • Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    In AmE: Grade 12 is not idiomatic. Exercise Test is contradictory (exercises are not tests). Practical is not used like this.
    SAT Practice Test for Seniors.
     
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    Amber_1010

    Senior Member
    Chinese-Cantonese
    What about: "Practice Test for the SAT"??

    I understand the logic that exercise is not test, if it doesn't make sense in AE, I believe it doesn't make sense in BE as well?? :confused:

    Thanks!
     

    bicontinental

    Senior Member
    English (US), Danish, bilingual
    Nice explanation by Myridon… other possibilities include, SAT Practice Questions, or Practice Test for the SAT.

    Bic.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Google and other search engines on the Internet are very useful to find out whether expressions are used. :)

    When I entered "GCSE Exercise Test" (with quotes), Google replied:

    No results found for "GCSE Exercise Test".
     

    Amber_1010

    Senior Member
    Chinese-Cantonese
    Google and other search engines on the Internet are very useful to find out whether expressions are used. :)

    When I entered "GCSE Exercise Test" (with quotes), Google replied:

    No results found for "GCSE Exercise Test".
    Thank you!
    I wonder, is it wordy/unnecessary to say/write "Exercise for practice"?? I think so.
    I found that word in my math worksheets and textbooks.
    :confused:
     

    Wordsmyth

    Senior Member
    Native language: English (BrE)
    I meant what if we were talking about the British GCSE?
    Then can we say "GCSE Exercise Test"?
    I mainly would like to know whether the word is used in BE that way.

    Thanks!
    No, it doesn't make sense in BE either. As Myridon said, an exercise is not a test.

    Just as others have said in an AE context, you could say, in BE, "GCSE practice questions" or "... practice exercise(s)" or "... practice test", though those might just mean one or more questions on subjects in the exam syllabus.

    If you're setting a test that represents a typical full exam, with the same time allowed, to be done in exam conditions, then in BE we talk about a "mock exam" or "mock examination". Those are both standard terms, though colloquially people talk about "mock GCSEs" or "GCSE mocks" (and similarly for other types of exam).
    You need to be concerned only with AE since the SAT is an American institution.
    ... although there are tests called SATs in the UK (except Scotland, where they have a different system). But those SATs (Statutory Assessment Tests) aren't the same thing as the American SAT. The UK SATs are carried out at various ages to determine pupils' progress.

    Ws:)
     

    Miss Julie

    Senior Member
    English-U.S.
    You need to be concerned only with AE since the SAT is an American institution.
    ... although there are tests called SATs in the UK (except Scotland, where they have a different system). But those SATs (Statutory Assessment Tests) aren't the same thing as the American SAT. The UK SATs are carried out at various ages to determine pupils' progress.
    I knew I should have clarified it; the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) is an American institution. :eek:
     
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