Expired or expiring.

ray8838

Senior Member
Chinese
1. An expired contract will have no legal effect.

2. An expiring contract will have no legal effect.

Sentence 1 is natural, but seems ungrammatical. We should use a present participle ( instead of past participle) to function as an adjective to modify "contract"regarding an active expression。

Am I correct?
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    The past participle can be used that way for intransitive verbs.

    Transitive: Someone broke the contract. So the contract is broken, and it is a broken contract.
    Intransitive: The contract expired. So it is an expired contract.
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    A contract can be expiring, in the present or near future. It can also be expired, in the past. In sentence 1, the past is meant, so expired is used. It is correct.

    (Cross-posted.)
     

    ray8838

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    A contract can be expiring, in the present or near future. It can also be expired, in the past. In sentence 1, the past is meant, so expired is used. It is correct.

    (Cross-posted.)
    I've never seen such usage: A contract is expiring or can be expired。 Can you say more?
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    "An expiring contract" is in the process of expiring - the expiration date is still in the future - so it should still be in effect.
     

    ray8838

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    "An expiring contract" is in the process of expiring - the expiration date is still in the future - so it should still be in effect.
    "A contract is expiring " means "a contract will expire in the near future"。So we have an expiring contract。

    Correct?
     
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