Expired VS Dead/Deceased Person

aasim84

Member
India - Urdu and English
Hi everyone,

I am from India and the use of the word expired denoting a dead person is very common here.

Is it an appropriate euphemism?
 
  • suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    It might be used in India, I cannot say, but I would not use it in the UK. For one reason it would make most of us think of Monty Python's Dead Parrot sketch (you can find this on youtube!)

    There are lots of euphemisms for being dead, so any good thesaurus should show you a range of options.
     

    JustKate

    Senior Member
    Deceased is more common. Expired would be understood (I think) but it's sufficiently unusual that people might be momentarily confused by it.

    My own preference is to just say dead because I don't find euphemisms for death at all comforting, but I realize not everyone agrees with me on that, so in deference to the different sensibilities of others, I often used deceased.
     

    WyomingSue

    Senior Member
    English--USA
    I used to work in the operating room, emergency room, and a nursing home. "Expired" would be used in a medical setting, but not usually anywhere else.
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    ...Expired would be understood (I think) but it's sufficiently unusual that people might be momentarily confused by it.
    ...
    Yes indeed, It happened to me. I had an Indian client who came in with his father's passport, telling me he had expired and asking what he should do.

    I knew there was some language problem, but of course I imagined that he meant it had expired. I hope he didn't think I was being terribly rude when I asked if his father wanted to renew it...
     

    aasim84

    Member
    India - Urdu and English
    It might be used in India, I cannot say, but I would not use it in the UK. For one reason it would make most of us think of Monty Python's Dead Parrot sketch (you can find this on youtube!)

    There are lots of euphemisms for being dead, so any good thesaurus should show you a range of options.

    I do know a few euphemisms for being dead but still wanted to make sure if the word expired used by us Indians is correct or not.

    I have lately observed that some of the terms used in colloquial Indian English are considered completely incorrect or markedly deviant by native speakers.

    I am just making an honest effort to sound as "unIndian" as possible :p

    Thank you everyone! :)
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I had an Indian client who came in with his father's passport, telling me he had expired and asking what he should do.

    I knew there was some language problem, but of course I imagined that he meant it had expired. I hope he didn't think I was being terribly rude when I asked if his father wanted to renew it...
    Exactly. Outside of the clinical usage, when I hear "expired" I think of a license, a magazine subscription . . .
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Hi everyone,
    I am from India and the use of the word expired denoting a dead person is very common here.
    Your thread title indicates you are talking about "expired" as an adjective while your text appears to be asking whether it's appropriate to be used as a noun, e.g. "The expired was taken to a funeral home."

    Could you please verify?

    (We do, of course, use "expire" as a verb, but that doesn't seem to be what you are asking.)
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I agree with sdg: I think it would be useful to see some context and an example sentence, aasim84:).

    (Just to say - we have realised several times in past threads that Indian English uses expressions that AmE and BrE doesn't. But that doesn't make those expressions 'incorrect'.)
     
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