explore and explorate

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LittleBrother

Member
Romanian
Hi all,

I've recently read a paper written by a non-native English speaker that said:

"(...) our paper explorates Hegel's dialectic (...)"

Since I have never used "explorate" in any of my writings, but only "explore", I wonder if this sounds correct to native English speakers. After a quick search on the web for "explorate", I have found that only on-line dictionaries such as dictionary.com recognize this word, which makes me all the more doubtful.

Should anyone care to help, it would be very much apperciated.
 
  • panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Here is the dictionary.com entry for explorate (my emphasis):
    Ex*plo"rate\, v. t. [L. explorare, exploratum.] To explore. [Obs.] --Sir. T. Browne.

    The [obs.] means that it is obsolete.
    Don't use it.
    It would be understood, of course.
    In older writing, it would be accepted.
    In current writing, it would be assumed to be an error.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Here is the dictionary.com entry for explorate (my emphasis):
    Ex*plo"rate\, v. t. [L. explorare, exploratum.] To explore. [Obs.] --Sir. T. Browne.

    The [obs.] means that it is obsolete.
    Don't use it.
    It would be understood, of course.
    In older writing, it would be accepted.
    In current writing, it would be assumed to be an error.
    I never heard of this word so I Googled it "explorate, definition".

    Farlex On-line and Webster's list this as a synonym for explore.

    Collaborative International Dictionary and Dictionary.com list the same definition but call it obsolete.

    I would certainly say that it is rarely used and probably be avoided. Apparently this is a word on the crux; some think it is obsolete, some do not.
     
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