Explorer to push brussels sprout up Mount Snowdon with his nose

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NewAmerica

Banned
Mandarin
What? The title really beats me. What does it mean?

Mount Snowdon the highest mountain in Wales.

Brussels sprout is a vege.

"With his nose" seems to mean "with great efforts."

So I guess that the title mean "Explorer makes great efforts to grow brussels sprout in the Mount, which implies this area is previously not suitable for the growth of it.

Am I on the right track?

Thanks in advance
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Explorer to push brussels sprout up Mount Snowdon with his nose

-metro.co.uk
Source
 
  • NewAmerica

    Banned
    Mandarin
    As I read the report, it came to be clear that this man actually push a round-shaped vegetable up the mount in order to raise money for cancer.
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    Brussels sprout is a vege.
    No, it's a vegetable.
    "With his nose" seems to mean "with great efforts."
    No. You seem to be confusing this with some unrelated idiom. The meaning here is quite literal: To push by using his nose.
    So I guess that the title mean "Explorer makes great efforts to grow brussels sprout in the Mount, which implies this area is previously not suitable for the growth of it.
    You are very much on the wrong track. How did "push" become "grow"?
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    The early and mid 20th-century comic writer Beachcomber repeatedly wrote about contests between people pushing peas up mountains with their noses. (Amazingly, I can't find examples on Google*.) Someone is just re-using his joke.

    * Here's one: his column reprinted in the Singapore Free Press, 3 August 1955. The contest between Evans the Hearse and his challenger the 'Bessarabian Eel' will take place on the western face of Snowdon.
     
    Last edited:

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    The only thing I take from this thread is that "Brussels sprouts" can be interchanged with "Brussel sprouts". I always used and heard the latter. A Google search shows that both are in use. I am not clear which is "correct" however.

    There was a child's party game where we had a race to push things across the finish line using only our noses. Once most of the families had installed carpeting, I stopped playing that game. You'd end up with a rug-burn on the end of your nose if you raced on carpeting.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    The only thing I take from this thread is that "Brussels sprouts" can be interchanged with "Brussel sprouts". I always used and heard the latter. A Google search shows that both are in use. I am not clear which is "correct" however.

    There was a child's party game where we had a race to push things across the finish line using only our noses. Once most of the families had installed carpeting, I stopped playing that game. You'd end up with a rug-burn on the end of your nose if you raced on carpeting.
    The "Brussel" version seems to have been created by someone hearing the name and not noticing the two s's and thinking only the one at the beginning of sprout was there:) From wikipedia "Brussels sprouts first appeared in northern Europe during the fifth century, later being cultivated in the thirteenth century near Brussels from which they derived their name".

    The thing I learnt from this thread is that some people no longer think of Brussels as a proper name and don't capitalize it :(
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    [...]

    The thing I learnt from this thread is that some people no longer think of Brussels as a proper name and don't capitalize it :(
    Birdseye skirts the issue. Whereas they use upper and lower case letters throughout, they use only upper case for "BRUSSELS".

    All the frozen foods listed "Brussels" with the "s" at the end.

     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    they use only upper case for "BRUSSELS".
    At least their capital 'B' is bigger than the other capitals. :) Unfortunately, so is their initial 'S' in "SPROUTS". :(
    To make matters worse, all the other words on the bag (except "in the") are also capitalized. And so, even if they hadn't used an all-caps font, they would have written it as "Brussels Sprouts", and we would still have been none the wiser.

    By the way, it's "Birds Eye", not "Birdseye". I could have sworn their brand name used to have an apostrophe in it: "Bird's Eye". But I may be misremembering. Perhaps some of our resident "oldies" know better.
     
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