express something "in / with" words

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  • Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    This is simply one of many ways of saying you are so grateful ( or some other emotion) that you can't find enough words to express your gratitude. It has no implications of finding some other way, although the old joke is "Forget about the words, just hand over the money!"

    Yes they mean the same thing. The first quote was written by a Texan and the second by an Indian. I don't think the different prepositions suggest different meanings. They are simply the ones chosen by those individuals. I find both of them awkward, not exactly wrong but not quite right for some reason. If I were going to use this cliche I would express it differently.

    :)
    Hermione
     

    kaaskaa

    Senior Member
    Polish
    This is simply one of many ways of saying you are so grateful ( or some other emotion) that you can't find enough words to express your gratitude. It has no implications of finding some other way, although the old joke is "Forget about the words, just hand over the money!"

    Yes they mean the same thing. The first quote was written by a Texan and the second by an Indian. I don't think the different prepositions suggest different meanings. They are simply the ones chosen by those individuals. I find both of them awkward, not exactly wrong but not quite right for some reason. If I were going to use this cliche I would express it differently.

    :)
    Hermione
    How would you express it Hermione?
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Gosh, I nearly had a heart attack because I had no recollection at all of having written this! Thank goodness it's from so long ago. :D
    The problem with both the OP sentences is using 'words' at all.
    Being hypercritical and taking them literally, I'd think the person saying it is either lazy, or has a poor command of the English language.

    The most usual expression is "I can't thank you enough for [noun/verbal noun]". Another is "I can't tell you how grateful I am for [noun/verbal noun], or " ... how much I appreciate + [noun phrase]".
    There are lots of other expressions.
    A very formal one uses "express gratitude" which is for very special help, something like being rescued from a flooding cave.
    Do you have a sentence or occasion to ask about?
     
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