extra rinse, extra spin (washing machine)

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zaffy

Senior Member
Polish
Washing machines often give an opportunity to select 'extra rinse' or 'extra spin'. Now, how can I use those phrases naturally? Are they countable or uncountable? For example:

A: Something is wrong with my washing machine. I still see traces of powder all over the clothes after the washing is done.
B: Trying setting the washing machine to (an) extra rinse next time. /Try selecting (an) extra rinse/ I guess you need to give the laundry (an) extra rinse.
A: Will that require (an) extra spin too?
B: Sure.

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  • heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I've never had to say this, but if I knew the listener had a machine with an 'extra rinse' facility, I think I would say 'Try giving it an extra rinse.'
     

    zaffy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    And how about these? Are they natural? Say someone has a problem operating their washing machine.

    "Can you show me how to select an extra spin?"
    "Can you show me how to set the washing machine to an extra spin?"
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    When referring to “extra rinse” and “extra spin” as the settings on the machine, don’t add an article. When referring to them in any other way, do use an article or other determiner.

    If you think the washing isn’t dry enough and needs an extra spin, just put it on again on “extra spin”.
    Did that extra spin do the trick?
     

    zaffy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    And here? Do I use a noun or gerund?

    "Something is wrong. The spin doesn't work."
    "Something is wrong. Spinning doesn't work."
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    “The spin / spinning doesn’t work” is OK grammatically, but it’s not clear what you mean by it — the extra spin function on the machine doesn’t work, or giving the clothes an extra spin still hasn’t dried them enough?
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I think "extra spin" is part of the programming and something that you have to choose at the beginning. My washer has a knob where you can choose between one rinse and two rinses. You do that before you start the wash cycle. I would set the machine pictured for an extra spin before I initiated the wash cycle.

    But if you see powder on your clothes after it's been through a wash cycle and rinse cycle then you have big problems. It should have dissolved into the water long before.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    B: Trying setting the washing machine to "extra rinse" next time. /Try selecting "extra rinse"/ I guess you need to give the laundry an extra rinse.
    A: Will that require an extra spin too?
    All the names for the programmes that are on the machine are names and thus uncountable
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    There's no hard and fast rule here. "Try giving it an extra rinse" is a perfectly reasonable thing to say. "Try giving it extra rinse" is not. "Try selecting Extra Rinse" is also perfectly acceptable. There's no need to put that in added quotation marks - you can't hear them, and capitalization in the written form tells you it is what the writing on the machine says.

    "These clothes still have traces of powder all over after the washing is done."
    "Try giving them an extra rinse next time."
    "How about the blankets, will they require an extra rinse?"
    "Probably. You might select Extra Spin too."
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    The problem with this example is that it is all spoken. Capital letters and inverted commas however, do tend to show in spoken English: there is invariably a slight pause around, and/or emphasis on, the word that has been marked out.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Well, actually, it is written. My point is that articles may or may not be appropriate, depending on the sentence. "Extra rinse" may be a description of what might be done, or be the label beside a button. One may have an article, the other will not.
     

    zaffy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    And If someone asked me what the three basic washing cycles/phases are, should I reply using nouns or gerunds?

    -Well, the three main cycles are washing, rinsing and spinning
    -Well, the three main cycles are wash, rinse and spin.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    What is written on the machine is Wash, Rinse, Spin, etc. so that's what seems most natural.
     

    zaffy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Is this conversation natural?

    A: "How long does the spin take in your washing machine?"
    B: "Well, it depends on what programme I've set, usually about 20 minutes."
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    English (northeastern US)
    I'd say 'How long does the spin cycle take on your washing machine?' But what you wrote is certainly understandable.
     
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