"Extract of" or "extract from"?

Kinyonga

Member
English - England
"This is an extract of the book War and Peace," is what I would have always said, but recently I was told it should be " an extract from". Can anyone give me a definitive answer to this?
 
  • dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    You can extract some text from a book.
    You can extract some text out of a book.

    You cannot extract some text of a book.

    So "from" is correct, and "of" is wrong.

    You use "of" in "part of", but not "extract of".
     

    Kinyonga

    Member
    English - England
    You can extract some text from a book.
    You can extract some text out of a book.

    You cannot extract some text of a book.

    So "from" is correct, and "of" is wrong.

    You use "of" in "part of", but not "extract of".
    But "extract" is not being used as a verb, but as a noun, here. Sure, "from" works in both cases, but you would hardly say "This is an extract out of a book."
     

    Linkway

    Senior Member
    British English
    The phrase "an extract of" is used but with a different (related) meaning:

    The WR dictionary definition 7. applies:

    a solid or liquid substance containing the essence of a food, plant, or drug in concentrated form:beef extract;
    vanilla extract.
     
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