extricate...with...

LQZ

Senior Member
Mandarin
felt my feet squelching and sticking in something soggy. There was no bog to my knowledge near the track, so I must have wandered a long way off my course. I extricated myself with difficulty and very cautiously edged myself towards the sound of the sea.
Dear all,

The above is taken from a textbook, and I am wondering whether "I extricated myself with difficulty" sounds correct to your ear, because "extricate...from.." is commonly used. Looking forward to your opinons. Thanks in advance.


LQZ
 
  • LQZ

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    Yes it sounds correct. Do you think it should be written a different way?
    Thank you, bluegiraffe.

    Actually before posting this thread, I've looked extricate up in many dictionaries, all of which suggest "extricate...from".:eek:

    Could you please tell me whether "extricate...with" and "extricate...from..." have the same meaning? Are they interchangeable? Thanks.
     

    bluegiraffe

    Senior Member
    English - England
    No, the with refers to difficulty.

    I read with difficulty.
    He speaks German with difficulty.

    Extricate is usually used with from. In your sentence it wasn't necessay - the writer had already explained what she/he was stuck in.
     

    MichaelW

    Senior Member
    English (British)
    "Extricated" does not necessarily need a "from", in this case it is obvious that it is the bog which he is stuck in. "With difficulty" qualifies the verb, showing in what manner he extricated himself.
     

    LQZ

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    Thank you, bluegiraffe and MichaelW. I've got it. I first misunderstood the meaning of the quote.
     
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