Eyes are smarting

ADMP

Senior Member
Sinhaleese - Sri Lanka
Can we use "SMART" in these contexts and please help me to find the correct way of saying these.
  1. Eyes start smarting when cuting onions
  2. Sometimes you get smrting feeling when you pass urine
  3. My mouth will shart smarting for spicy food
  4. Your mouth will ....... when you eat spicy food
 
  • Trisia

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    Hello, ADMP. What do you mean by "smart"? I can't find in the dictionary a definition that would suit your purposes. Do you mean pain? I'm not sure it's used like this...

    Here's my try:
    1. When cutting onions, your eyes may sting.
    2. ....
    3. When I eat spicy food, my tongue starts to sting.
     

    ADMP

    Senior Member
    Sinhaleese - Sri Lanka
    Hello, ADMP. What do you mean by "smart"? I can't find in the dictionary a definition that would suit your purposes. Do you mean pain? I'm not sure it's used like this...

    Here's my try:
    1. When cutting onions, your eyes may sting.
    2. ....
    3. When I eat spicy food, my tongue starts to sting.

    Sting is syninyms for smart.
    smart (STING) verb
    *to cause someone to feel a stinging pain:


    I have heard people using smart ( my mouth is smarting) very often. That's why I wanted to know the correct way of using it.

     

    little_vegemite

    Senior Member
    english
    Err, um. : ) Sometimes. In books. : ) It's not a word that enters conversation because it can be replaced by those other more common words.
     

    little_vegemite

    Senior Member
    english
    Well in response to ADMP, sentence number 3 is incorrect. You would say 'just thinking about spicy food makes my mouth start to smart/mouth smart." At least that's the meaning i understand from sentence 3.
    And in no. 2 you would have to put an 'a' before 'smarting'. And I haven't heard smarting used with eyes, in no. 1. I would use stinging.
     

    ADMP

    Senior Member
    Sinhaleese - Sri Lanka
    1. Eyes start smarting when cuting onions
    2. Sometimes you get smrting feeling when you pass urine
    3. My mouth will shart smarting for spicy food
    4. Your mouth will ....... when you eat spicy food
    In these cases is it possible to use "burn" instead of "smart"
     

    little_vegemite

    Senior Member
    english
    maybe for spicy food...though usually in english we say something along the lines of "my mouth is on fire" when eating spicy food, that is if you're unaccustomed to spicy food.
     

    ADMP

    Senior Member
    Sinhaleese - Sri Lanka
    Can we say like this without using sting or is there nay other best way to express these ideas?
    1. Eyes start burning when cuting onions
    2. Sometimes you get burning feeling when you pass urine
    3. My mouth will shart burning for spicy food
    4. Your mouth will ....... when you eat spicy food
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    "Tearing" (Pronounced "teering")

    Tearing is not quite the same. It is the visible manifestation of the irritation (visible tears), but in many cases it is used interchangeably.

    "I was making a salad;just cutting some onions, and my eyes started tearing."
     

    ADMP

    Senior Member
    Sinhaleese - Sri Lanka
    "Tearing" (Pronounced "teering")

    Tearing is not quite the same. It is the visible manifestation of the irritation (visible tears), but in many cases it is used interchangeably.

    "I was making a salad;just cutting some onions, and my eyes started tearing."

    Many thanks for your reply and I would like to know about other sentences as well.

    1. Sometimes you get burning feeling when you pass urine
    2. My mouth will shart burning for spicy food
    3. Your mouth will ....... when you eat spicy food
     

    Trisia

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    Sentence 1 looks fine to me.

    2. is wrong. You can't burn for something, unless you mean you desire it a lot.
    My mouth/tongue will start burning/stinging after [I've eaten/had] spicy food.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    In college my Indian roommate did some cooking with a lot of curry and other spices. He said:

    "Taste this. Don't let it get on your lip; it will raise a blister."

    Now, that is spicy.
     

    AngelEyes

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    In AE, it's not unknown at all! I think it's used most often by younger people.

    I wouldn't use it to describe painful urination, though. That doesn't mean you couldn't. That just means for that type of pain, other words work better.

    It's also used in this context:

    Someone says something to you that's possibly hurtful, definitely insulting, maybe just unknowingly cruel.

    Example:
    "You know, you'd be really pretty if your nose weren't so big."

    You might answer:
    "Ouch! That smarts."

    It's really used in a clipped, sometimes subtle, to-save-my-pride way to mean, "You hurt me like hell, but I'm not going to show it."

    ADMP:
    In most case to indicate pain, you could say, "That smarts!"

    AngelEyes
     
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