Eyvallah shades of meaning?

< Previous | Next >

lisaleira

Member
English, US
Hello all,

I speak Arabic and I’m learning Turkish, and I’m trying to understand the shades of meaning in Eyvallah. I guess in Arabic it would be ايه والله، like yes by god? I’m curious about the etymology, like where the phrase comes from or what it kind of means. I’ve read it means things like thanks or farewell or a whole range of meetings. Would anyone like to share their understanding of what this word means or can mean and why it means that? It took a long time in Arabic to get a sense of what idioms mean, so I appreciate how it might take quite a while now in Turkish, Even with simple but deeply cultural phrases.. This idiom (I suppose it’s an idiom?) is some thing I feel that I don’t get and would love to see your perspective!
 
  • LeBro

    Member
    Turkish
    I don't know its etymology but it is most probably of Arabic. There are those who can help you more with its etymology and adventure in Turkish. All I can tell you as a native speaker of Turkish is I would use this phrase in such situations:

    In the sense of "thanks". But I would never use it in a formal setting and not with everyone.

    In the sense of "so be it!", which indicates resentment.

    These two are the only ones I can think of for myself. And yes, sometimes can be used when taking your leave, in which case I would say "hadi eyvallah", but of course used only in informal settings.
     

    Rallino

    Moderatoúrkos
    Turkish
    It's from "eyi" (good) and "vallahi". So it's half Turkish half Arabic.

    [ Yunus Emre, Bütün Şiirleri, 1320 yılından önce]
    Köken
    Türkiye Türkçesi eyi vallahi sözcüğünden evrilmiştir.
     

    Akinci

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Hello all,

    I speak Arabic and I’m learning Turkish, and I’m trying to understand the shades of meaning in Eyvallah. I guess in Arabic it would be ايه والله، like yes by god? I’m curious about the etymology, like where the phrase comes from or what it kind of means. I’ve read it means things like thanks or farewell or a whole range of meetings. Would anyone like to share their understanding of what this word means or can mean and why it means that? It took a long time in Arabic to get a sense of what idioms mean, so I appreciate how it might take quite a while now in Turkish, Even with simple but deeply cultural phrases.. This idiom (I suppose it’s an idiom?) is some thing I feel that I don’t get and would love to see your perspective!

    https://www.etimolojiturkce.com/kelime/eyvallah
     

    lisaleira

    Member
    English, US
    Ah thank you! I thought it was like "ey" in Arabic, but iyi makes more sense. Thanks

    It's from "eyi" (good) and "vallahi". So it's half Turkish half Arabic.

    [ Yunus Emre, Bütün Şiirleri, 1320 yılından önce]
    Köken
    Türkiye Türkçesi eyi vallahi sözcüğünden evrilmiştir.
     

    lisaleira

    Member
    English, US
    Actually, from the etimolojiturkce.com website, doesn't that seem to indicate that it derives from the arabic "Ey", "yes" and "wallah", "by god" - rather than from the Turkish "iyi", "good" and the Arabic "wallah", "by god"?

    Or am I reading this incorrectly..

    Ah thank you! I thought it was like "ey" in Arabic, but iyi makes more sense. Thanks
    .
     

    Akinci

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Actually, from the etimolojiturkce.com website, doesn't that seem to indicate that it derives from the arabic "Ey", "yes" and "wallah", "by god" - rather than from the Turkish "iyi", "good" and the Arabic "wallah", "by god"?

    Or am I reading this incorrectly..



    .
    An Ottoman Turkish dictionary defines the word in that way

    ايوالله - Eyvallah osmanlica ne demek, ايوالله anlami, ايوالله kamus turki

    1590353229106.png


    Ey + vallah

    Ey = harf-i tasdik (Word of confirmation. for example OK, YES)
    Vallah = I swear to God or Allah.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top