Für das / dafür

Feuer Krieger

Member
Portuguese - Brazil
Hello, fellows

I've seen this sentence in a book: "Ich glaube auch, dass sowohl Presse als auch Politiker die Deutschen für das verantwortlich machen wollen, was in England im Argen ist." Would it be possible to transform "für das" in "dafür"? If so, would both be interchangeable or their uses have any difference?

Thank you in advance
 
  • Captain Lars

    Senior Member
    Deutsch (D)
    Yes, they would be interchangeable.

    "Dafür" is, in this case,

    a) a tad more colloquial

    b) a tad less precise, since "für das" points directly towards "was in England im Argen ist". "Was" refers directly to "das".
     

    Gernot Back

    Senior Member
    German - Germany
    I've seen this sentence in a book: "Ich glaube auch, dass sowohl Presse als auch Politiker die Deutschen für das verantwortlich machen wollen, was in England im Argen ist." Would it be possible to transform "für das" in "dafür"? If so, would both be interchangeable or their uses have any difference?
    Let's take a simpler example:

    1. Ich beneide euch dafür, was ihr geschafft habt.:cross:
    2. Ich beneide euch für das, was ihr geschafft habt.:tick:
    3. Ich beneide euch dafür, etwas geschafft zu haben.:tick:
    4. Ich beneide euch für das, etwas geschafft zu haben.:cross:
    5. Ich beneide euch dafür, dass ihr etwas geschafft habt.:tick:
    6. Ich beneide euch für das, dass ihr etwas geschafft habt.:cross:

    Let's take a look at the last part after the comma:

    In the case of the first two sentences we are dealing with relative clauses. As sub-clauses, relative clauses need a phrase in the main clause, to which they refer. If the relative pronoun starts with a "w", it usually refers to sth. very general like a whole sentence

    Er hat mir erzählt, dass du schnarchst, was ich aber auch schon mit eigenen Ohren gehört habe.

    ... or it refers to a pronoun

    Das ist das/alles/etwas, was ich gesehen habe.

    ... or it refers to a nominalized adjective representing sth. very abstract:

    Das ist das Großartigste/Fürchterlichste/Schönste/Schlimmste, was ich je gesehen habe.

    Relative clauses are attributes by definition.

    Lexikon Sprache: Digitale Bibliothek Band 34: Metzler Lexikon Sprache said:
    Es ist ratsam, Relativsätze vom Typ Er aß, was er gefunden hatte; Wir belächelten, was dort geschehen war nicht als O[bjekte] zu bezeichnen: Der durch was eingeleitete Nebensatz ist eigentlich ein Relativsatz, wobei was den Zusammenfall von Bezugselement (das) und Relativpronomen (was) darstellt. Ein solcher Relativsatz ist also eigentlich eine NP: Das Matrixverb läßt keinen Satz als Obj. zu, Obj. ist das Pronomen das (nur durch einen Relativsatz erweitert). Der Satz ist nicht Obj., sondern Attribut zum Obj.
    http://www.wer-weiss-was.de/theme143/article2250424.html

    I do not think that attributes can define pronominal adverbs like dabei, dafür, damit, etc. in German. That is why I marked the first sentence as wrong.

    The case is totally different with sentences #3 through #6:

    Here the sub-clause is either a dass-clause or an infinitive clause (with "zu"). Unlike relative clauses, these are definitely always noun clauses and have no attributive function. The function of a preceding pronoun is that of a placeholder element for the following sub-clause, which is often optional.

    I do not think that in Standard German a placeholder das can represent a prepositional phrase by simply adding a preposition before. Instead, it is mandatory that both elements, preposition and pronoun, merge as a pronominal adverb to become a placeholder for the following sub-clause. That is why I marked sentence #4 and sentence #6 as wrong.
     

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    Let's take a simpler example:

    1. Ich beneide euch dafür, was ihr geschafft habt.:cross:
    2. Ich beneide euch für das, was ihr geschafft habt.:tick:
    3. Ich beneide euch dafür, etwas geschafft zu haben.:tick:
    4. Ich beneide euch für das, etwas geschafft zu haben.:cross:
    5. Ich beneide euch dafür, dass ihr etwas geschafft habt.:tick:
    6. Ich beneide euch für das, dass ihr etwas geschafft habt.:cross:
    I basically agree with that, except that I wouldn't call 1. strictly "wrong" but just bad style, but this is a nuance. There is maybe a simpler (maybe too simple, but it is a good rule of thumb) way to cast this into a single rule or explanation: In unmarked speech the sequence "für das" isn't used at all. The apparent counter example 2. can be explained by identifying "das, was ihr geschaft habt" as a single noun phrase which is preceded by the preposition "für".

    In marked speech, "für das" can be used to place particular emphasis on "das", e.g.: Für das danke ich Dir (but not for anything else) vs. the unmarked Dafür danke ich Dir.
     

    Hamlet2508

    Senior Member
    English
    In marked speech, "für das" can be used to place particular emphasis on "das", e.g.: Für das danke ich Dir (but not for anything else) vs. the unmarked Dafür danke ich Dir.

    I do think you can put just as much emphasis on Dafür (but not for anything else) danke ich Dir. Particularly pernickety German teachers might have your head for Für das danke ich Dir (but not for anything else) - no offense meant.
     

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    I do think you can put just as much emphasis on Dafür (but not for anything else) danke ich Dir. Particularly pernickety German teachers might have your head for Für das danke ich Dir (but not for anything else) - no offense meant.
    There is an important difference in meaning, that's why they teach you that because you could unknowingly offend people (let me translate it a bit more drastically):
    Dafür danke ich Dir - I thank you especially for that.
    Für das danke ich Dir - I thank you for that but in every other respect you are an arsehole.
    :p
     
    Last edited:

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Hi,
    "für das" can be a synonym for "dafür" as discussed above.
    But it may also be analogue to "für den/diesen" or "für die/diese" (singular) or "für die/diese" (Plural)

    Ich habe ein Buch gekauft. Für das/für dieses/dafür habe ich 5 Euro bezahlt.
    Ich habe eine Flasche gekauft. Für die/für diese/dafür habe ich 5 Euro bezahlt.
    Ich habe eine Hund gekauft. Für den/für diesen/dafür habe ich 5 Euro bezahlt.
    Ich habe fünf Steine gekauft. Für die/für diese/dafür habe ich 5 Euro bezahlt.

    In all of these cases it refers to nouns.

    In the examples above it refers to properties defined by verbs (was ihr geschafft habt).
    Here it is not gender specific, as far as I see it uses neuter singular in all cases.

    Ich habe 10 Flaschen gekauft.
    Ich habe eine Schachtel Pralinen gekauft.

    In both cases it is: Ich danke dir für das, was du für mich gekauft hast.

    In my other cases it would be gender specific:

    Ich habe einen Mantel gekauft.
    Ich danke dir für den, den ihr für mich gekauft habt. etc.
     
    Top