FA Cup tie [Football]

JuriTerreni

Senior Member
Chinese-China
From BBC's <500 greatest goals>,

It took just three minutes for Manchester City to take the lead in their FA Cup tie in January 2010.
What does "FA Cup tie" mean? I know what FA Cup is, but tie here, I'm confused, I looked up the match results, Manchester won by 4-2. So it's not a tie.
Thank you.
 
  • Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I disagree with Rover. My understanding is that a tie is a match in a knock-out competition, and the OED appears to agree, stating that the meaning derives from tie meaning a drawn match.
    Hence: a deciding match played after a draw; also, a match played between the victors in previous matches or heats. (See also cup-tie n. at cup n. Compounds 3b.)
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Andy,

    I agree that a tie is a match in a knock-out competition (such as the FA Cup), but I feel that the OED entry that you reproduce confuses the issue, because:

    1) A cup tie (a game played in a knock-out competition) is not necessarily "a deciding match played after a draw"; and nor is it necessarily

    2) "A match played between the victors in previous matches or heats" - Think of the first round of the FA Cup.

    "FA Cup tie" could be confusing for those who have learned AE. "Tie" in AE means that the scores were level at the end of the game. That's not the meaning of "tie" here. In BE, an "FA Cup tie" means a game in the FA Cup, which is a knock-out competition.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    The OED entry, which is too long to quote here, shows that this use of "tie" originated as meaning a match with equal scores, then added the meaning of a replay, and then came to mean a match in a knockout competition. And the word is still used to mean a draw with equal scores in BE, although perhaps not in football. A tie in cricket is a rare event, and most drawn matches are not ties, but when a tie happens it is recorded as a tie, not a draw.
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    From BBC's <500 greatest goals>,

    It took just three minutes for Manchester City to take the lead in their FA Cup tie in January 2010.
    What does "FA Cup tie" mean? I know what FA Cup is, but tie here, I'm confused, I looked up the match results, Manchester won by 4-2. So it's not a tie.
    Thank you.
    A Cup tie is a match in the Cup. Obviously such matches can be tied and there are rules about how such an impasse is resolved; often there is extra time and then a replay if the match remains undecided.

    Because the expression 'a cup tie' is so common in British English, we would find other ways of expressing that the match was tied.

    In the context you gave us, Juri, 'an FA Cup tie' can only mean a match in the FA Cup.

    If I hadn't been doing the forum for a long time, I would be surprised to learn that there are native speakers who aren't familiar with the expression.

    An FA Cup tie cannot be a league match - we don't talk much of league ties - and the FA (Football Association) Cup is a knock-out competition in soccer. The word soccer was derived from the word association, in the 19th century by British schoolboys or university students, I think.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    A Cup tie is a match in the Cup. Obviously such matches can be tied and there are rules about how such an impasse is resolved; often there is extra time and then a replay if the match remains undecided.

    Because the expression 'a cup tie' is so common in British English, we would find other ways of expressing that the match was tied.

    In the context you gave us, Juri, 'an FA Cup tie' can only mean a match in the FA Cup.

    If I hadn't been doing the forum for a long time, I would be surprised to learn that there are native speakers who aren't familiar with the expression.

    An FA Cup tie cannot be a league match - we don't talk much of league ties - and the FA (Football Association) Cup is a knock-out competition in soccer. The word soccer was derived from the word association, in the 19th century by British schoolboys or university students, I think.
    The definition in#2 was for "tie" and the example was "a cup tie". I have always thought these were only describing knockout (AE : single elimination) competitions where a cup is the ultimate victors' trophy. It is certainly confusing that the word can also be used to describe the outcome :)
     
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