'face time' vs 'face to face' [in a family]

Yoshiee

Senior Member
Japanese
Hello,

THis is a small question, but on a TV program for English language in Japan, the words was used like " I need some face time with this client."

And he explained this phrase can be used in only business scene.

I understand this meaning however I am wondering whether there is a good phrase having the same meaning for family/friend scene?

Or can " Face to face" be used for the family scene like " I need to talk to you my son face to face."? Is this strange to use?
 
  • Tazzler

    Senior Member
    American English
    The expression "one-on-one" has the same meaning. There is also the simple adverb "personally", which can be used for any context.. I'd never heard of the expression "face time" before, and a quick search suggests it's a rather recent expression.
     
    Last edited:

    Yoshiee

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Hello, Tazzler

    Thank you for your comment.

    I understand the "face time" could be a bland new phrase. I will learn more.

    Anyway, I have not heard "one-one-one" so far, could you please let me know some example, using this phrase?
     

    Yoshiee

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Yes, indead. I am sorry for my mistakes.

    So the following are correct to use?

    1) I need one-on-one meeting with the client.(business)
    2) I need to talk to you my son one-on-one.(family)

    Please let me know your suggestion?
     

    Tazzler

    Senior Member
    American English
    The second one is correct to my ears, but most people wouldn't address their son with "my son". It sounds a little bit quaint. :) The first sentence should read "a one-on-one meeting", but you could also say "personal meeting".
     

    Bevj

    Allegra Moderata (Sp/Eng, Cat)
    English (U.K.)
    I think that in BrE 'one to one' is commonly used.
    To me, 'face to face' suggests some sort of confrontation, for example 'We are going to sort this out face to face.'
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    "Face time" is of fairly recent vintage, but there are already more than a million entries for it on Google. I think it probably represents a shortening of "time spent face to face". I see no reason why, as someone suggested, it would be restricted to business use; it could certainly be used in family and other social situations, as well.
     

    grubble

    Senior Member
    British English
    I suspect that "face-time" originated in the USA. It has probably migrated to the UK recently but, over here, it sounds very business oriented. I can imagine a businessman saying it to his son but it would not be used by most British people in the family.

    I would never use it at all because it sounds like jargon to my ears.
     

    Yoshiee

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Hello, everyone

    Thank you for your help and suggestion.

    Regarding the TV program, the english is AE. Recently English has become AE in Japan. However in my schools, the English were always BE. After that in my business period, it was changed to AE.

    Anyway, thanks again.
     
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