Facility vs accomodation

SleepyMutt

Senior Member
Russian
What word would fit in with this context?
We are looking for another accomodation/facility for our shop.

The word should mean kind of a room but not exactly a room. It can consist of many rooms.
 
  • Tegs

    Mód ar líne
    English (Ireland)
    I would say "location" in this case. Accommodation doesn't work - that's usually a room you want to sleep in. A facility isn't clear - it could mean a piece of equipment.
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    Yes, "another location" would work.
    I might also say "other premises".

    It isn't entirely clear whether you want to move your business to a new location or expand your business by adding a second location.
     

    SleepyMutt

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Yes, "another location" would work.
    I might also say "other premises".

    It isn't entirely clear whether you want to move your business to a new location or expand your business by adding a second location.
    Dictionaries say that premises include a piece of land. But there is no land implied on my part.
     

    SleepyMutt

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Does location imply a piece of land? I don't mean that. Doe example, I am inside of a building browsing a possible place for the shop. Is this place a location?
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    Dictionaries say that premises include a piece of land. But there is no land implied on my part.
    The rooms you are looking for will be in a building, and the building will be on land. In that sense, land is always implied. It is perfectly normal to use "premises" to refer to a shop location.

    Here is one of Webster's definitions: a building or part of a building usually with its appurtenances (such as grounds) (Note the word "usually", so it doesn't have to include land).
    Does location imply a piece of land?
    Only indirectly, and not in all contexts. You can certainly use "location" for what you want.
    What exactly do you mean? "kind of a room but not exactly a room" isn't very clear.

    Are you looking for office space or a traditional shop where customers will come in off the street? We can sometimes use the word "shop" for this, for example: "We are looking for another shop for our business."
     

    SleepyMutt

    Senior Member
    Russian
    The rooms you are looking for will be in a building, and the building will be on land. In that sense, land is always implied. It is perfectly normal to use "premises" to refer to a shop location.
    I am not sure that this is what is implied by the difenition. Otherwise even a shop on a roof would have have a piece if land. Obviously it doesn't. An unoccupied piece of land is meant. Is it always premises or premise in such a case?
    Here is one of Webster's definitions: a building or part of a building usually with its appurtenances (such as grounds) (Note the word "usually", so it doesn't have to include land).

    Only indirectly, and not in all contexts. You can certainly use "location" for what you want.
    What exactly do you mean? "kind of a room but not exactly a room" isn't very clear.
    I mean a space confined by walls.
    Are you looking for office space or a traditional shop where customers will come in off the street? We can sometimes use the word "shop" for this, for example: "We are looking for another shop for our business."
    I am looking for a generic word which would convey a space confined by walls.
     
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