Failure became something to embrace instead of fear...

johnj7

New Member
US, English
Hi everybody,

I've wrestled with this sentence for a while:

Through the learning process, failure became something to embrace instead of fear, as it was necessary for growth and progress.

The "it" seems like it's referring to "fear," but I want it to refer to "failure."

I could just leave the fear part out: Through the learning process, failure became something to embrace, as it was necessary for growth and progress.

But, I would like to include the fear part.

Does anyone have suggestions for improvement?

Thanks!
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    The way I read your sentence, you did refer to failure. If you want to make that a little clearer, you might try:

    As/because it was necessary for growth and progress, I learned to embrace failure rather than fear.
     
    Last edited:

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    "It" does refer to "failure," so no problem there. I do like "rather than" rather than "instead of."

    Through the learning process, failure became something to embrace rather than fear, as it was necessary for growth and progress.
     

    johnj7

    New Member
    US, English
    So... how much for editing services from both of you?

    Just kidding of course. Thanks for all the help.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I just noticed something in rereading my answer: Through the learning process means as a result of the learning process, whereas Throughout the learning process means during the time of the learning process (well, to me, anyway).

    So I'm wondering if you don't mean "Throughout" -- all the way through the learning process, at every step of the process.

    Throughout the learning process, failure became something to embrace rather than fear, as it was necessary for growth and progress.

    If I'm right, I'll feel much more comfortable billing you at my usual rate. :)
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top