faire face à...

Syagrius

Senior Member
Français. Québec¸Canada.
Bonjour

Voici ma phrase :

Pierre, l’air mauvais, s’avance vers Gonelle et lui "fait face".

Pierre, looking bad, approaches Gonelle and "faces up to him".

Faire face et "face up to him" est-ce pareil ?

Merci.
 
  • CARNESECCHI

    Senior Member
    French / France
    Hello,
    "face down" = To attain mastery over or overcome by confronting in a resolute, determined manner: face down an opponent in a debate; faced the enemy down.
    "face up" = To confront an unpleasant situation with resolution and assurance: had to face up or get out; finally faced up to the problem.

    In your case, I think "facing him/her down" would be better
    Hope it helps!
     

    jakey

    Senior Member
    English, Aus
    Syagrius said:
    Bonjour

    Voici ma phrase :

    Pierre, l’air mauvais, s’avance vers Gonelle et lui "fait face".

    Pierre, looking bad, approaches Gonelle and "faces up to him".

    Faire face et "face up to him" est-ce pareil ?

    Merci.
    Pierre, visibly unhappy, goes up to Gonelle to confront him/to face up to him.
     

    Graham Butler

    Senior Member
    England English
    Hi Syagrius,
    Carnesecchi is absolutely right in his definitions and I'd usually talk about 'facing up' to a problem, but in common speech I've often heard of footballers (etc.) 'facing up' to each other. If you face up to someone you confront him with an aggessive posture. He may equally face up to you, or he may back down, in which case you will have faced him down. (So 'facing up' is the attitude and 'facing down' is the result.)

    Another phrase you often here in this context is 'to square up to someone'. I's say that the difference is that when you 'face up' to them you are just posturing nose to nose (as footballers do) and have no real intention of hitting them, whereas if you square up to them you are in a boxer's stance and are going to set about them.

    Am I right in thinking that you Canadians also talk about a 'face off' in hockey?

    To come back to your sentence, I hhave a couple of observations.
    1. 'looking bad' suggests to me that Pierre was in poor health. Maybe think about some other way of a saying it, depending on the context , 'with an evil glint in his eye', 'with a murderous look on his face'.
    2. Are you using in French the historic present, where we would use a past tense in English? If it's a story in the past, the past tense would be more natural.
     
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