faire une recette

  • misterk

    Moderator
    English-American
    Hmmm... "Cook a recipe" doesn't sound quite right to my ears.
    I'd use "make a recipe":
    Which recipe are you going to make tonight?
    I've had no luck making the recipes from that book.

    "Follow a recipe" is also fine, but it has a different meaning:
    If you want the cake to come out right, you have to follow the recipe exactly.
    Did you follow a recipe when you made that chicken dish, or did you just make it up?
     

    pointvirgule

    Senior Member
    langue française
    Those are all good answers. If we only knew what the question is...

    Whatever do you mean by faire une recette, tinkaline13??
     
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    Calina18

    Senior Member
    francophone Québécois d'origine belge
    Those are all good answers. If we only knew what the question is...

    Whatever do you mean by mean by faire une recette, tinkaline13??
    ;)
    Je crois qu'on peut présumer sans trop de risques d'erreur qu'on essaie de traduire l'expression "faire une recette".
     

    pointvirgule

    Senior Member
    langue française
    Mais justement, qu'est-ce que ça veut dire, faire une recette ? Inventer une recette ? Cuisiner un plat à partir d'une recette ? Faire est trop vague.
     
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    Calina18

    Senior Member
    francophone Québécois d'origine belge
    "Faire une recette" peut en effet avoir de multiple sens, mais si ça peut vous éclairer, je vous cite un extrait de la question originale : Do a recipe? Follow a recipe?
    Peut-être y verrez-vous la subtilité.

    Quand je fais ma recette de poulet aux olives, les invités se régalent, mais ils savent que je n'ai pas créé cette recette. Souvent ils m'en demandent une copie pour la faire à leur tour.
     
    Maybe because some recipes aren't cooked at all.
    Or maybe because he doesn't know that "cook a recipe" is also used in many contexts, including:

    Which recipe are you going to cook tonight? (sounds fine)

    In this one:
    I've had no luck making the recipes from that book.
    (here I would prefer "make")

    And here:
    Don't use this recipe again -- it has too much vinegar!
    Don't make this recipe again -- it has too much vinegar!

    Use (follow) and make are not synonyms - they technically mean different actions things.

    .....
    Another example:

    "So every time you cook a recipe, you're testing it?"

    This is different than saying: "So every time you use a recipe, you're testing it?"
     

    Nicomon

    Senior Member
    Français, Québec ♀
    Je pense comme pointvirgule que « faire une recette » est bien vague.

    [...] Quand je fais ma recette de poulet aux olives, les invités se régalent, mais ils savent que je n'ai pas créé cette recette. Souvent ils m'en demandent une copie pour la faire à leur tour.
    Ici, j'aurais dit : quand je fais/quand je leur sers mon (fameux, délicieux, etc.) poulet aux olives... L'ajout de recette en début de phrase me semble superflu.
    Souvent, ils me demandent la recette... oui.

    Il peut m'arriver de dire faire + recette dans un contexte du genre :
    - J'ai fait des muffins, mais (comme je n'avais pas assez de farine) je n'ai pas fait la recette complète; je l'ai divisée en deux.
    - Comme j'attends des invités/parce que j'aime bien avoir des restes, j'ai fait une double recette de xyz.

    Et dans ce cas, je dirais : make.

    À mon avis - il vaut ce qu'il vaut ;) - les autres suggestions, cook, use, follow, prepare (on peut penser aussi à bake pour la pâtisserie) on tous des équivalents français, qui ne seraient pas... faire.
     
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    guillaumedemanzac

    Senior Member
    English - Southern England Home Counties
    I wouldn't cook a recipe. How? Would you boil it or fry it? Faire is so general it fits all situations. Ask for examples and you get (as above) a lot of different usages.
    I never follow a recipe exactly as I make minor changes to the recipe I am using.
    If I am using a Delia Smith recipe I find it very easy to follow because her instructions in writing the recipe are so clear and simple to follow.
    As a student I used to make up recipes (to invent them), because I only had the ingredients in the kitchen - so I made it up as I went along.

    And so on - I think the other examples suggested above are generally correct in their particular situation.

    guillaume
     

    Nicomon

    Senior Member
    Français, Québec ♀
    [...] Faire is so general it fits all situations. Ask for examples and you get (as above) a lot of different usages.
    That's were we disagree. Faire is too vague. Just as you wouldn't say make/do everywhere... we wouldn't in French either. At least I wouldn't.

    I never follow a recipe exactly as I make minor changes to the recipe I am using.
    Je ne suis jamais une recette à la lettre, car je fais de petits changements/j'ajoute des touches personnelles à la recette que j'utilise.

    If I am using a Delia Smith recipe I find it very easy to follow because her instructions in writing the recipe are so clear and simple to follow.
    Si j'utilise une recette de Delia Smith, je la trouve facile à suivre car ses directives écrites sont bien claires.
    (I realise that this near litteral translation isn't terrific - I just wanted to show the verbs)

    As a student I used to make up recipes (to invent them), because I only had the ingredients in the kitchen - so I made it up as I went along.
    Quand j'étais étudiant(e), je m'amusais à créer des recettes (les inventer), à partir des ingrédients que j'avais sous la main - je les créais/inventais au gré de ma fantaisie.
    (This one is adapted a bit)


    And so on - I think the other examples suggested above are generally correct in their particular situation.
    They are... they just don't translate « faire une recette » which, at the risk of repeting myself, is way too vague.

    As I wrote above, those are situations where I might say « faire une recette ».
    I baked muffins, but since I didn't have enough flour for a full recipe, I only made half a recipe.
    As I have people coming for dinner/like to have leftovers, I made a double recipe/doubled my recipe of...

     
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    guillaumedemanzac

    Senior Member
    English - Southern England Home Counties
    I agree with the variety of French usages for faire - exactly the same as in English.

    However I wouldn't say I made half a recipe or I only made half a recipe or I cooked a recipe. A recipe is the piece of paper (or book) from which you work when cooking. You can double up the quantities/amounts in the recipe or you can use half the stated quantities and thus only make half a batch of muffins. In usage dictionaries e.g. Fowler or the BNC, you can see that all the usages quoted depend on context and more modern texts and treatises on usage use the symbol ? or ?? or ??? to show dubious usages that are perfectly grammatical but sound odd, incorrect or simply unenglish.
    guillaume
     
    A recipe is the piece of paper (or book) from which you work when cooking.
    Not necessarily, a recipe need not have any material form at all. It is in its essence a list of ingredients along with the description of how to prepare them.

    And that is why it appears to me that on a technical level, saying "you will cook a recipe" is a kind of metonymy. Like saying you will "sew a pattern."
     

    guillaumedemanzac

    Senior Member
    English - Southern England Home Counties
    Or: I can eat a recipe ??? I can wear a pattern ??? She sewed a pattern for me ??? He devoured the latest novel from JKR :tick:
    Acceptability is often personal which is why we put ? or ?? or ??? instead of :cross:.
    And of course Americans will find something acceptable that English speakers don't - and vice-versa.

    guillaume
     

    Nicomon

    Senior Member
    Français, Québec ♀
    [...] However I wouldn't say I made half a recipe or I only made half a recipe [...] and thus only make half a batch of muffins.
    Granted, I also would be more likely to say "half a batch" than "half a recipe". But made a double recipe (as in I doubled the ingredients)
    doesn't sound so odd to me.

    What I mean to say is that "make a recipe" doesn't sound worse (or better, for that matter) than « faire une recette ». Both are too vague.
     

    tinkaline13

    Senior Member
    French
    Thank you for all your very useful answers. My question wasn't clear enough...but Calina18 got it right! "Quand je fais ma recette de poulet aux olives, les invités se régalent, mais ils savent que je n'ai pas créé cette recette. Souvent ils m'en demandent une copie pour la faire à leur tour. "
     
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