1. Tamnat New Member

    Adelaide
    Australia English
    Hi all
    I am trying my best in my limited French to translate 'Fake a smile. Fool the world. Protect your heart'. It is in the context of someone who has a broken heart and is pretending to be fine. I've come up with 'Truquer un sourire. Duper le monde. Proteger votre coeur.' Can someone advise if I am on the right track? I'm a bit unsure on truquer and I haven't spoken french for over 15 years.....:) Many thank you's!
     
  2. mgarizona

    mgarizona Senior Member

    Phoenix, AZ
    US - American English
    I'd try 'feindre un sourire, tromper le monde, protéger votre cœur' I guess.
     
  3. balaam

    balaam Senior Member

    belgium
    french (belgium)
    your translation is correct but very litteral.

    truquer un sourire is a serious offense. it is the landmark of hypocrysis. we would say "souris !", the faked aspect is understated.

    "Souris puisque c'est grâve !
    Seules les plaisanteries doivent
    se faire dans le plus grand sérieux.
    "
    Alain Chamfort


    duper is a little to formel. there is a flavor a scam. "tromper son monde" / "trompe ton monde" is nearer to the original meaning, i think. note the possesive adjective. FYI, a cheating husband trompe sa femme.

    Protège ton coeur is absolutely right. I never heard it but it may be used without susciting an eyebrow. protége toi est plus courant.
     
  4. balaam

    balaam Senior Member

    belgium
    french (belgium)

    feindre un sourire
    est excellent ! cependant il garde cette conotation d'hypocrisie et d'escroquerie


    while I'm at it. the three verbs are infinitive. is that what you want ?
    the imperative form sound exactly the same way but replace the -R suffixe with -Z.
    feindre become feins. the final -S us mute and help distinct imperative from past participe.

    a bit of advice would be imperative. a self choosen rules or a mantra would be infinitive.
     
  5. mgarizona

    mgarizona Senior Member

    Phoenix, AZ
    US - American English
    Good point. I just assumed he was going for the rule/mantra "voice." Char (my obsession) uses the infinitive-as-imperative all the time so I hardly notice it anymore and didn't think to ask.
     
  6. balaam

    balaam Senior Member

    belgium
    french (belgium)

    "char" ?
     
  7. Randisi Senior Member

    Boalsburg, PA
    English, USA
    René Char, le poète.
     
  8. balaam

    balaam Senior Member

    belgium
    french (belgium)
    honte sur moi ! je suis le plus inculte des béotiens !
     
  9. Tamnat New Member

    Adelaide
    Australia English
    Thank you all so very much for your help with this. The text is for a play and it is indeed a mantra of sorts, said by the main character to herself. You have all been most helpful :)
     

Share This Page

Loading...