fall down / fall off/ fall from a waterfall

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keramus

Senior Member
Persian
Hello everybody

I want to describe this picture.

ky-11.jpg

A man fell down/ fell off/ fell from a waterfall.
Which one should I choose?
I think the first and the third sound correct but I'm not sure.

Please tell me your opinion.
 
  • heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Excuse me, I mean an involuntary action.
    He slipped and fell down/fell off/ fell from a waterfall.
    What was he doing before he slipped? What was he standing on?

    He definitely couldn't 'fall off' or 'fall from' a waterfall. But more context would be helpful in choosing the right preposition.


    Cross-posted.
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I can't find the actual article that this headline belongs to. Without more details, I'm struggling to see how anybody can be on a waterfall, which they would need to be before they could fall from it.

    The same would go for 'fall off'.

    'Fall down', however, does work.
     

    Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    So is "fall over" correct too?
    If the river or stream was a slow moving, shallow one, I suppose it's possible that a man could stand in the water at the edge of the fall, and lose his balance and fall over. In that case you could say he fell over the edge of the fall, or fell down the waterfall, or even, to use the words of the articles linked to in #9 and 11, fell from the waterfall.

    But in situations of this sort, it's much more likely that he fell into the water and was "swept over" or "went over" the waterfall.
     
    Last edited:

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    If the river or stream was a slow moving, shallow one, I suppose it's possible that a man could stand in the water at the edge of the fall, and lose his balance and fall over. In that case you could say he fell over the edge of the fall, or fell down the waterfall, or even, to use the words of the articles linked to in #9 and 11, fell from the waterfall.

    But in situations of this sort, it's much more likely that he fell into the water and was "swept over" or "went over" the waterfall.
    Thank you!
    What does "over" mean in ""swept over" or "went over""? Is that like "on", please?
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Excuse me, I mean an involuntary action.
    He slipped and fell down/fell off/ fell from a waterfall.
    "Swept"? (My favorite as it most nearly describes what I would imagine would have happened.)

    A man waded into the water near the Niagara Falls and was quickly swept down the falls to his death.


    "Went over". (My least favorite as it adds nothing to the meaning.)

    A woman went over the Niagara Falls early yesterday when she accidentally fell into the river not far from the falls.


    "Washed over"

    Last night a man washed over the falls to his death. The police are listing it as a probable suicide.
     

    Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    you are on the waterfall,
    "On" is just not the right word here. I can't say why--it just isn't correct.

    "Over" here refers to going over the edge. It means something like "past" or "across". I think definition 2 in the WR dictionary is the applicable one here.
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    "On" is just not the right word here. I can't say why--it just isn't correct.

    "Over" here refers to going over the edge. It means something like "past" or "across". I think definition 2 in the WR dictionary is the applicable one here.
    I understand. Thank you Barque. And thank you tunaffi and Packard.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    You can "approach the waterfall" and you can "approach the waterfall dangerously close to the falls itself".

    The actual edge that the water falls over is the "precipice". I will see if I can find an example of "precipice" with "waterfall".

    Addendum: I found it easily.

    Waterfall Precipice Images, Stock Photos & Vectors | Shutterstock

    waterfall precipice images


    And...

    Waterfall | Meaning of Waterfall by Lexico

    waterfall
    noun


    • A cascade of water falling from a height, formed when a river or stream flows over a precipice or steep incline.
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    You can "approach the waterfall" and you can "approach the waterfall dangerously close to the falls itself".

    The actual edge that the water falls over is the "precipice". I will see if I can find an example of "precipice" with "waterfall".

    Addendum: I found it easily.

    Waterfall Precipice Images, Stock Photos & Vectors | Shutterstock

    waterfall precipice images


    And...

    Waterfall | Meaning of Waterfall by Lexico

    waterfall
    noun


    • A cascade of water falling from a height, formed when a river or stream flows over a precipice or steep incline.
    Thank you!
     
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