Fall for ... on ... Oil Platform Far into the ... North Sea

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HSS

Senior Member
Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
Hi, I was just wondering if 'fall for someone on a windswept oil platform far into the grey North Sea' was a kind of set phrase. I don't see any mention of Marcus (this tanned, good-looking Texan) having worked drilling wells on oil rigs off in the North Sea. But then again this may be introducing the fact. I naturally take it to mean she was in love with him head over heels. Could it also be written as 'fell for him on ... platform, and far into the grey North Sea'?
This tanned, good-looking Texan had been a knight in shining amour to the girl with stunning looks and long blonde tresses who fell for him on a windswept oil platform far into the grey North Sea. Their passion had produced a laughing, gurgling, crying, smiling, crawling, falling bundle of joy named Jasmine. ('Mummy, Take me Home' by David Leslie)
 
  • sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Hi, I was just wondering if 'fall for someone on a windswept oil platform far into the grey North Sea' was a kind of set phrase.
    No.

    We have the expression "to fall for someone," meaning having romantic feelings for somebody.

    The oil rig in the North Sea has nothing to do with it any more than somebody mucking out horse stables in Kentucky. It's just tells you where the object of her affection was working, which could be anyplace.
     

    HSS

    Senior Member
    Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
    Thanks, sdgraham.

    ... fell for him on a windswept oil platform far into the grey North Sea.

    Wouldn't it be more grammatical if it was:
    ... fell for him on a windswept oil platform, and far into the grey North Sea (from there).

    Technically you can't fall on the platform and fall into the sea at the same time.
     

    Fabulist

    Banned
    American English
    No, sorry, you are misconstruing the sentence in a couple of ways.

    First, "fall for" is a fixed phrase that is divorced from the simple "fall," meaning to change from a higher to a lower elevation or go from standing to lying on the ground. It means, as sdgraham explained, to become romantically interested in or entranced by someone.

    Second, the sentence omits a couple of optional words that might help you understand that the platform is "far into the grey North Sea." The sentence could have been written (but was not), "This ... Texan had been a knight ... to the girl ... who fell for him on a windswept oil platform that was far into the grey North Sea."

    Of course, if she "fell for him on a[n] oil platform" and the platform was "far into the North Sea," then she fell for him "far into the North Sea." But she did not plunge from the platform into the sea, and it is obvious from the construction of the sentence that since she fell for him on the platform, and the platform was far out to sea, she fell for him far out to sea.
     

    HSS

    Senior Member
    Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
    Oh, I see, Fabulist. It's the word 'into' that misguided me. 'Into' normally is used an action verb --- go into the room, fly into the airport etc. I took 'fell' as the accompanying verb here. Now that you mentioned the right interpretation, I see it in the clear --- a windswept oil platform that was located far in(to) the grey North Sea.

    Thanks, Fabulist.

    Hiro
     
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