fall into the trope of an oppositional shill for an out-of-power boss

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NewAmerica

Banned
Mandarin
"Fall into the trope of an oppositional shill for an out-of-power boss" sounds very fluent in English. Does "an out-of-power boss" here refer to former President Obama?

Thanks in advance
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On a practical level, there are ethical and legal restrictions over what former science officials can do. And in a city where former White House staffers can easily fall into the trope of an oppositional shill for an out-of-power boss, many have also been wary of making too big a splash.


-Scientific American

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  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Given that the title of the piece is "Obama’s Science Experts Operate Unofficial Shadow Network. With Trump in the White House, former staffers continue to press their positions." the answer to your question must be "Yes". :)

    sounds very fluent in English.
    The cynic in me would say "sounds as if they have lapsed into jargon to sound trendy and thrusting." :D
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    It is not a collocation. The sentence is simply a series of words that have, of late, been adopted into the vocabulary of certain speakers and writers.

    My comment does not disagree with your idea that one would have to be fluent in English in order to produce that sentence, rather, it comments on the style - as soon as you read the sentence, you know the perspective that the article will take, and you have a fair idea of the type of person that the author is.
     
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