fall into/under the definition of

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takashi0930

Senior Member
Japanese
This is an example sentence from a grammar book.

Parachutes do not fall into the definition of aircraft and neither do hovercraft.

(It's in the section explaining "neither", but my question here is about "fall into".)

Would it be incorrect to say "Parachutes do not fall under the definition of aircraft and neither do hovercraft"?


I learned somewhere that native speakers say "fall into the category of" (with "the category" of) or "fall under" (without "the category" of).
I'd like to know if this rule (of using "the category of" after "fall into" but not after "fall under") applies to the case of "definition".
 
  • takashi0930

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    The sentence is a fine one; common usage.
    Thank you.
    How about if I omit "the definition of"? Is this correct, too?
    Parachutes do not fall into aircraft and neither do hovercraft.
    Parachutes do not fall under aircraft and neither do hovercraft.
     
    I suppose you might say, Parachutes do not fall under 'aircraft'. That means the label 'aircraft'.

    "into" would be odd [first sentence], but as you say, "into the category of" is used.


    Thank you.
    How about if I omit "the definition of"? Is this correct, too?
    Parachutes do not fall into aircraft and neither do hovercraft.
    Parachutes do not fall under aircraft and neither do hovercraft.
     

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    How about this sentence dealing with the usage of articles:

    The number of specific rules and exceptions regarding usage can frustrate students of English as a second language, but most uses of articles fall under a few fundamental rules.

    Does fall into respond to fall under in this sentence?
     

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    'Fall under' means to come under the same grouping. For example, 'rain, snow, fog, wind, sunshine and frost' all fall under/come under the general heading of 'weather'.
    Thank you very much.

    How about fall under in this sentence:

    he number of specific rules and exceptions regarding usage can frustrate students of English as a second language, but most uses of articles fall under a few fundamental rules.
     
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