fall off / fall of

< Previous | Next >

Northen_shine18

Member
Spain & Basque
When is used fell off and when fell of?
Thank you

For example:
I fell off the chair.
I fell from the chair.
I fell of the chair.

Please give examples.
 
  • Tresley

    Senior Member
    British English
    It should always be 'fell off'

    Examples:

    I fell off my bike
    She fell off the swing
    He fell off the cliff

    It is always 'off', because it is the opposite of 'on'

    I was riding on my bike, and then I suddenly fell off
    She was playing on the swing, and then she suddenly fell off
    He was walking on the cliff, and then he suddenly fell off

    I hope this helps.
     

    nh01

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    I think if we use the verb "to fall" and the words "bike/chair" etc. together, we should always use "off", for example, we can say "It is very dangerous to fall off a bike/chair". But if we use the noun "fall" and those words together, we can use "of" , for example, we can say "I can never forget how the fall of the bike/chair on my friend". Am I right or wrong?
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I think if we use the verb "to fall" and the words "bike/chair" etc. together, we should always use "off", for example, we can say "It is very dangerous to fall off a bike/chair". But if we use the noun "fall" and those words together, we can use "of" , for example, we can say "I can never forget how the fall of the bike/chair on my friend". Am I right or wrong?
    Hello nho1

    Well, we can use the verb "fall" with different prepositions: "fall off" certainly works, but so does "fall from".

    We can probably also use the noun "fall" with more than one preposition.

    I'm a bit confused, though, by your sentence "I can never forget how the fall of the bike/chair on my friend".

    Can you explain, in other words, what you want it to mean?
     

    nh01

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Well, first, I should change my sentence because I realized that I did not write it correctly. Actually, I wanted to write that "I can never forget the fall of the bike/chair on my friend"." And I was trying to tell that there was an accident and a bike/chair fell on my friend.

    But actually, I used those examples because if someone searched on the net for the verb, for example" "fall off the bike", he can sometimes get "fall of the bike" too. But I think the reason behind it is only about the different usage of the verb "fall" and the noun "fall. Am I wrong?

    And I was trying to compare only "fall off" and fall of".
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I wanted to write that "I can never forget the fall of the bike/chair on my friend".
    Actually, I don't think we'd ever say this. We'd be much more likely to say something like
    I will never forget the day the bike/chair fell on my friend.
     

    nh01

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    OK. Thank you. So I think we get search results such as "fall of the bike" and "fell of the bike" on the net because people write them incorrectly. Does something else come to your mind about the reason behind it?
     

    AnythingGoes

    Senior Member
    English - USA (Midwest/Appalachia)
    OK. Thank you. So I think we get search results such as "fall of the bike" and "fell of the bike" on the net because people write them incorrectly.
    I think you're right. Striking a key once instead of twice is a common error.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top