Fall off/from the roof

Korenson

New Member
Russian Belarus
Hello, dear friends!

I am courious about the right usage of the phrase like
He fell off/from the roof (of a building)

Which option is correct? And can I use the short phrase He fell when the curcamstances of the accident are known to the companion?
Thank you very much
 
Last edited:
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Hi, Korenson. Both "off" and "from" look entirely normal in that example. If your companion knows the circumstances already, you can certainly use a shorter version like "when he fell" if you need to talk about that incident: Do you remember when he fell?
     

    karlalou

    Banned
    母国語:日本語
    He fell from the roof.
    He fell off from the roof.
    He fell off the roof.

    Do they mean the same?

    The WR dictionary says a splinter is "a small, thin, sharp piece of wood, bone, etc., split off from the main body:", and, to me, this is easy to understand, but Oxford dictionary says a splinter is "a small, thin sharp piece of wood, metal, glass, etc. that has broken off a larger piece", and I feel uneasy. Is it a difference between American and British?
     
    He fell from the roof.
    He fell off from the roof.
    He fell off the roof.

    Do they mean the same?

    The WR dictionary says a splinter is "a small, thin, sharp piece of wood, bone, etc., split off from the main body:", and, to me, this is easy to understand, but Oxford dictionary says a splinter is "a small, thin sharp piece of wood, metal, glass, etc. that has broken off a larger piece", and I feel uneasy. Is it a difference between American and British?
    My OED dictionary shows "broken off from a larger piece"
     

    karlalou

    Banned
    母国語:日本語
    Thank you, RedwoodGrove and Dale Texas. :)

    Ok. So sometimes off or from or off from, all work, but not always..
    I think the falling from the outer space example is especially great!
     
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