fall on? to? onto?

jakartaman

Senior Member
Korean
You're either standing or walking and something happens(you either trip or faint) and your body drops onto the ground.

In this case, would you say,
1. I fell to the ground
2. I fell on the ground
3. I fell onto the ground
4. I dropped to the ground
5. I dropped on the ground
6. I dropped onto the ground

If more than one is right, is there any difference in meaning?

Many thanks in advance.
 
  • cropje_jnr

    Senior Member
    English - Australia
    All six are correct and I can't discern any difference in meaning. The only slight nuance could be that 'to' is about the actual fall/drop, whereas 'on' and 'onto' seem to describe the actual contact more. But this difference is minimal if even existent in the first place ;).
     

    jakartaman

    Senior Member
    Korean
    nzfauna, can you make it clearer? You mean only #1 is correct in this context. The other 5 are okay in some other contexts? Like what? I would appreciate if you or anybody could help.
     

    nzfauna

    Senior Member
    New Zealand, English
    1. I fell to the ground = My preferred option
    2. I fell on the ground = Also OK, but less formal
    3. I fell onto the ground = OK, but not my preferred option
    4. I dropped to the ground = This is correct, but to me, it is something you do on purpose, for example, if you were being shot at.
    5. I dropped on the ground = unidiomatic
    6. I dropped onto the ground = Maybe ok, but same sense as 4.
     

    WildWest

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    The sentence below is from a simplified version of a novel called The Pelican Brief, which is published by Penguin Readers.

    "Khamel fired three bullets into the back of his head and he fell loudly on to the table."

    Some say that if "on" is an adverb, you should write them seperately; if it's part of the preposition you should not. I have difficulty understanding the use of it above. Would it matter if it was written as "onto"? I just can't see on here as an adverb. I think it also can't be replaced with "over".

    The same applies to another sentence in the same book, which requires a new thread: "fitted a silencer on to his gun."
     
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