fall over/parts of our anatomy

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bernad

New Member
Turkey/Turkish
May be I shouldn't have asked 2 phrases at once but I'm just not sure about their meanings.
"The likes of Bartalomeo Eustachio, James PArkinson and Thomas Hodgkin (they are phsyscians or anatomists) have fallen over each other in the scramble to attach their names to parts of our anatomy or our ailments."
 
  • GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Think of people in a crowd who are all rushing to do the same thing. They might collide with each other, and trip, and fall. This sentence calls that image to mind -- naturally, the anatomists (who did not all live at the same time!) did not literally rush towards some registry of anatomy and medicine to have their names attached to something (a disease or a part of the body), but the writer is suggesting that they were eager to have this happen.

    As for part of the body, anything that is not an entire body is a part of the body. For example, an arm is a part of the body; a leg is a part of the body, the retina of the eye is a part of the body, the Eustachian tube in the ear is a part of the body, and so on.
     
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    gasman

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    have fallen over each other in the scramble to attach their names to parts of our anatomy or our ailments."
    I really don't believe that such a thing is the case. The names became attached because these were the people who first described the condition or anatomical existence, and they would have done so in writing. The names arose as references would point out that they were those who wrote the original descriptions of the disorder or the body part.
     
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