Fallout

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Artrella

Banned
BA
Spanish-Argentina
"Ruby was fascinated with the Burton story. I gave her a quick summary of the lawsuit and the fallout since it had been filed."


I've looked it up and found these definitions:
fall out (ARGUE) phrasal verb informal
to argue with someone and stop being friendly with them
He left home after falling out with his parents.
She fell out with her boyfriend over where to go on holiday.


falling-out /%fO:.lIN"aUt, %fA:-/ noun [U; rarely subject] informal
A falling-out is an argument.
Rachel and Fiona have had a falling-out and they aren't speaking to each other.

Fall out (MOVE) phrasal verb
(of soldiers) to move out of a line
"Fall out, men!" shouted the sergeant-major.
Compare fall in.


Since I need a noun "fallout" I think the best choice between these 3 definitions would be "Falling out". What do you think?

Art
 
  • Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    Artrella said:
    "Ruby was fascinated with the Burton story. I gave her a quick summary of the lawsuit and the fallout since it had been filed."


    I've looked it up and found these definitions:
    fall out (ARGUE) phrasal verb informal
    to argue with someone and stop being friendly with them
    He left home after falling out with his parents.
    She fell out with her boyfriend over where to go on holiday.


    falling-out /%fO:.lIN"aUt, %fA:-/ noun [U; rarely subject] informal
    A falling-out is an argument.
    Rachel and Fiona have had a falling-out and they aren't speaking to each other.

    Fall out (MOVE) phrasal verb
    (of soldiers) to move out of a line
    "Fall out, men!" shouted the sergeant-major.
    Compare fall in.


    Since I need a noun "fallout" I think the best choice between these 3 definitions would be "Falling out". What do you think?

    Art




    People I've got the answer! Thx Art :)
     

    dave

    Senior Member
    UK - English
    Well I guess you probably already know the answer, but in this context it means consequences or repercussions.

    I would guess that this use comes from nuclear fallout .
     

    EdisonBhola

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Can a "fallout" also be used to describe two people who have fallen out (or stopped being on friendly terms) with each other? As in:

    Peter had a fallout with his best friend over money.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I suppose you could, but English usually avoids pointless complication. In any case it would more correctly be a "falling-out".

    "Peter fell out with his best friend over money."
     
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