fan of Pierce Brosnan's / fan of Pierce Brosnan

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Hiden

Senior Member
japanese
I was told that we can say (1) but not (2) and that (3) is the correct one:
(1) I'm a big fan of yours.
(2) I'm a big fan of Pierce Brosnan's.
(3) I'm a big fan of Pierce Brosnan.
Why can we use the possessive pronoun in (1) but not in (2)?
 
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  • Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I don't know!:D
    I'm looking forward to learning why not. I prefer Pierce Brosnan's. That's because I would say 'I'm a great fan of yours', not 'A great fan of you'. I can't think why a proper name would change that pattern, unless it's idiom.
     

    Jimbob_Disco

    Senior Member
    British English (England)
    I don't know!:D
    I'm looking forward to learning why not. I prefer Pierce Brosnan's. That's because I would say 'I'm a great fan of yours', not 'A great fan of you'. I can't think why a proper name would change that pattern, unless it's idiom.
    Pierce Brosnan’s what?!
    I’d say ‘I’m a fan of Pierce Brosnan’.
    Can’t reason why, though, as I’d definitely say ‘a fan of yours’!
     
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    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I think it's standard to just use someone's name to say you're a fan. So I'd plump for I'm a fan of Pierce Brosnan = I'm a Pierce Brosnan fan.
     

    Jimbob_Disco

    Senior Member
    British English (England)
    I think it's standard to just use someone's name to say you're a fan. So I'd plump for I'm a fan of Pierce Brosnan = I'm a Pierce Brosnan fan.
    Your rewording (italicised, emboldened and underlined above in green) seems like a perfect rephrasing! That is, in my opinion, the best of the lot.
     
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