fancy! A Tevershall lad born and bred

< Previous | Next >

longxianchen

Senior Member
chinese
Hi,
Here are some words from the novel Lady Chatterley's Lover(the last paragraph, but nine) by Lawrence(the University of Adelaide,here):
Well, well! So her ladyship had fallen for him! Well her ladyship wasn’t the first: there was something about him. But fancy! A Tevershall lad born and bred, and she her ladyship in Wragby Hall! My word, that was a slap back at the high-and-mighty Chatterleys!

Well, the part in blue is a little confusing. I feel A Tevershall lad born and bred, and she her ladyship in Wragby Hall is the object of fancy(=imagine), but two Chinese versions translate fancy as an adjective, superior and fine. And I think "a Tevershall lad born and bred" refers to "a Tevershall lad born and bred (there)" or "a Tevershall born and bred lad"
 
  • dermott

    Senior Member
    B.E. via Australian English
    Fancy is an abbreviation of Fancy that. It's an expression that means something is hard to imagine or believe, but used ironically. You're right about the meaning of a Tevershall lad, etc.
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    "Fancy!" is just an exclamation denoting something worthy of note, or in this case of gossip, similar to "My word" in the following sentence. "A Tevershall lad born and bred, and she her ladyship in Wragby Hall" is not really an object of anything, it's just a couple of noun phrases in isolation, not intended to form a complete sentence, but their juxtaposition denoting a contrast. He had spent all his life in Tevershall, a small insignificant village, and she was a lady of the manor. What an unlikely match.

    "Born and bred" is a standard idiom, often directly suffixed to a place name, sometimes, as here, with "lad" or "lass" or similar, interposed. So yes, he was a lad born and bred in Tevershall.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top