fantastic protest

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Tenos

Senior Member
Arabic
In H.G. Well's novella, A Story of the days to Come, he talks about a sensible man who lives during the days of Queen Victoria, leading a very proper and right life, imposing his way of living on his children. In this sentence Wells talks about the children saying:
His boys went to good solid schools, and were put to respectable professions; his girls, in spite of a fantastic protest or so, were all married to suitable, steady, oldish young men with good prospects.

I would like to know what he means by "solid schools"? and does he mean by "fantastic protest or so" a strange protest?
 
  • e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    By a solid school I understand a school with a reputation for providing its pupils with a sound education, i.e. an education that was unlikely to make them think or question the accepted dogma or to teach out-of-the-ordinary subjects.

    Fantastic is more difficult -- it certainly does not have the modern meaning of wonderful. I would say that a fantastic protest or so means that one or two of the girls showed imagination in questioning their future with the type of young mean* described. Alternatively it could mean fanciful or capricious.

    *
    men

    Although Wells was an impressive writer of fiction, he was born in 1886 and his language sometimes reflects this. I remember devouring his short stories when I was a child.
     
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    Tenos

    Senior Member
    Arabic
    By a solid school I understand a school with a reputation for providing its pupils with a sound education, i.e. an education that was unlikely to make them think or question the accepted dogma or to teach out-of-the-ordinary subjects.

    Fantastic is more difficult -- it certainly does not have the modern meaning of wonderful. I would say that a fantastic protest or so means that one or two of the girls showed imagination in questioning their future with the type of young mean described. Alternatively it could mean fanciful or capricious.

    Although Wells was an impressive writer of fiction, he was born in 1886 and his language sometimes reflects this. I remember devouring his short stories when I was a child.
    thanks for your reply. But I have another question :) What does he mean by "oldish young men"?
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    I see it as young men who acted as if they were older than they were. For example, they were rather conservative in their outlook or were "stick in the muds".

    I certainly don't think that it was meant as a compliment. The same is true of the passage that you quoted.
     
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