Far from cry

Man_from_India

Senior Member
India
I received this book yesterday. After reading a couple of chapters I realised that sleep is far from cry and I finished it in a day! Coz It kept me hooked till the end.

From a tweet by a non native speaker.
I really couldn't understand that bold expression apart from its literal meaning which is very unlikely. I believe this is wrong.
Any comments on this is highly appreciated.
 
  • Man_from_India

    Senior Member
    India
    It makes no sense to me, ManfI. There's an expression "a far cry (from)" but the writer doesn't seem to be aiming for that.
    Thank you for your valuable input.
    To add to the worry, I was trying to search google to see if any dictionary lists that expression. To my surprise I didn't find it in any dictionariy, but there are some websites, most probably Indian, that lists this expression, while listing important idioms and phrases for exams aimed at entering Government services here. And they are very popular exams here. Very strange!
     
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    Man_from_India

    Senior Member
    India
    By the way, is it right to write like this:

    After reading a couple of chapters I realised that sleep is far cry and I finished it in a day!

    I don't think it is, though "far cry" can mean "a long distance", but it is inversely used with "from something", and that something has to be explicitly mentioned. That is how "far cry" is used.

    The only other use of it is as an intensifier of an Adjective like "far cry different from something" or "far cry short from something" etc.

    EDIT: I do find some small use, compared to "far cry from something", of "far cry" without "from something" where it mainly used to mean "different" rather than "distance".
    Another use where it means "distance" but not physical
    On looking back aftcr so many years havc passcd, to those times when I was privileged to know Abdu'l Bah in bodily form, perhaps the most unfading memory left can be summed up by these two words: Unity and Silence: and it is not a far cry , in reality, to translate these two words into Love and Wisdom--Unity the outcome of Love and Wisdom the outcome of Silence.
     
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    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    By the way, is it right to write like this:
    After reading a couple of chapters I realised that sleep is far cry and I finished it in a day!
    No. The phrase is "a far cry", and, as you say, although it can be used without "from something", in practice it rarely is unless the "something" is blatantly obvious.
    EDIT: I do find some small use, compared to "far cry from something", of "far cry" without "from something" where it mainly used to mean "different" rather than "distance".
    Another use where it means "distance" but not physical
    Yes. That is so.

    A: "What! You are saying that because Amrit owns a gun, it must have been him who shot the farmer? That's a bit of a far cry!"
     

    Man_from_India

    Senior Member
    India
    No. The phrase is "a far cry", and, as you say, although it can be used without "from something", in practice it rarely is unless the "something" is blatantly obvious.
    Yes. That is so.

    A: "What! You are saying that because Amrit owns a gun, it must have been him who shot the farmer? That's a bit of a far cry!"
    Can we say?

    After reading a couple of chapters I realised that sleep is a far cry and I finished it in a day!

    I don't think so. What do you think?
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    I thought that it was either marginally acceptable or marginally unacceptable. :D

    After more thought, I think it is unacceptable as the link between "reading" and "sleep" is not sufficiently obvious. More context is required.

    I started by intending to read a couple of chapters in bed last night, then, as the tension mounted, I realised that a good night's sleep would be a far cry. I finished it at 5:45 a.m!
     

    Man_from_India

    Senior Member
    India
    I thought that it was either marginally acceptable or marginally unacceptable. :D

    After more thought, I think it is unacceptable as the link between "reading" and "sleep" is not sufficiently obvious. More context is required.

    I started by intending to read a couple of chapters in bed last night, then, as the tension mounted, I realised that a good night's sleep would be a far cry. I finished it at 5:45 a.m!
    It was from a tweet. And the entire tweet is loke this:

    I received this book yesterday. After reading a couple of chapters I realised that sleep is far from cry and I finished it in a day! Coz It kept me hooked till the end.
    He was so hooked with the book that he could not sleep. It was probably the meaning he intended to convey.

    But I don't think this is correct
    After reading a couple of chapters I realised that sleep is a far cry and I finished it in a day!

    In this case "a far cry" doesn't convey the meaning he intended. And so it is not correct, I guess. Because in every individual use of "a far cry" I have noticed that the meaning of distance it expresses are not physical.
     
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