far fuori (figurato)

underhouse

Senior Member
Italian
Ho fatto fuori il libro in un paio d'ore (I read the book very quickly)
Ha fatto fuori un barattolo di marmellata in cinque minuti (he ate the jam very quickly)

How could I say it in English?

Thanks!
 
  • Binario

    Senior Member
    USA
    Russia, Russian
    Il mio tentativo: "I finished off a book (o qualcosa)". E un po' piu vicino al senso violento di "fare fuori".
     

    haywire

    Senior Member
    US - English
    "To devour" works for any food, but not for the book.

    If I were talking to friends or in another non formal situation about some sort of task (reading a book, doing homework, painting a house) they knew I worked on, I'd say something like:

    "I knocked it out in a couple hours" (it = the thing I did)
    "I made short work of it"

    If you're referring to a book I'd say: "The book was a quick read."

    If I were talking in some kind of more formal situation I'd say:

    "I finished the book quickly"

    There are dozens of ways to say it that are common.
     

    Cassidy's Mom

    Senior Member
    United States, English
    I agree you cannot use "devour" for the book example.

    Instead, why don't you use the set phrase "all in one go"?

    He finished the book all in one go.

    The food was gone all in one go/ I ate it all in one go.

    I read the book all in one go.

    He saw Venice all in one go.

    Works for me!
     

    haywire

    Senior Member
    US - English
    Devouring books may not be used in American English but is definitely used in Australian English and I'm pretty sure it is used in British English also. Interestingly, it is mentioned in the Encarta dictionary, which as far as I know, is American.

    2. take something in eagerly: to read, look at, watch, or listen to something eagerly
    Young children seem to devour her stories
    http://encarta.msn.com/encnet/features/dictionary/DictionaryResults.aspx?refid=1861604269



    Fair enough, but in my short 28 years of life I've never heard it used in reference to a book, a film, or a CD. The only exception I could think of outside of being related to the physical act of eating was being "devoured by fear" which is even an abstract way of saying he was eaten up by fear.

    If I heard someone say "Young children seem to devour her stories" the first thing that would pop into my head would be a bunch of kids eating books, seriously. :)
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    Fair enough, but in my short 28 years of life I've never heard it used in reference to a book, a film, or a CD. The only exception I could think of outside of being related to the physical act of eating was being "devoured by fear" which is even an abstract way of saying he was eaten up by fear.

    If I heard someone say "Young children seem to devour her stories" the first thing that would pop into my head would be a bunch of kids eating books, seriously. :)

    It must be only in certain parts of the States that it is used that way as I edited in my last post. The American Heritage Dictionary has it listed in the same way.
    3. To take in eagerly: devour a novel.

    http://www.bartleby.com/61/35/D0183500.html
     

    cialuzzo

    Senior Member
    english
    Salve JDR

    Depende dal contesto. In alcue contesti credo che va bene, ma come si usava Sciascia direi di no. Perche 'far fuori' significava 'to kill or to do away with' 'to dispatch' someone.

    Ciao, Cialuzzo
     

    neuromatico

    Senior Member
    English (Canadian)
    I would also say "I devoured that book", (and I guess we're not alone, Charles :)).

    But it's true that certain idioms are just not used in certain parts of the English-speaking world, like Louisiana and Texas. ;)

    Another variation is "polished off".
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    I would also say "I devoured that book", (and I guess we're not alone, Charles :)).

    But it's true that certain idioms are just not used in certain parts of the English-speaking world, like Louisiana and Texas. ;)

    Another variation is "polished off".
    How true. I use 'polish off' often when referring to food, but not about books. I notice, however, that Google has a few listings using it that way. :)

    P.S. I notice that some people say "gobbled up that book", which can also be used in relation to food.
     

    Bookmom

    Senior Member
    I have been a bookseller for over twenty years and I can tell you that devouring a book is not only an acceptable description of the way in which one tears through the pages of a book, it is a succinct and evocative description of the sensation of being grabbed and propelled through the pages. It's what I hope for, anticipate and cherish when a good read fulfills the promise of the words written on it's pages. I devoured Linda Olsson's "Ingrid & Veronika" last weekend. I felt like I was holding my breath until the last sweet sentence.
     

    rubuk

    Senior Member
    Italiano
    I have been a bookseller for over twenty years and I can tell you that devouring a book is not only an acceptable description of the way in which one tears through the pages of a book, etc...

    Sometimes we use the same expression in Italia: Hai letto il libro? L'ho divorato in due orette. (colloquial)

    St.
     

    Aryetti

    Senior Member
    Italiano - dialetto veneto :D
    E come si traduce invece in questo contesto?
    Si è fatto fuori da solo, nel senso che si è rovinato e si è fatto cacciare grazie alle sue azioni (e non per volere altrui).
     

    Mary49

    Senior Member
    Italian
    I just put in "polished off that book" and only got 2 listings. :(
    neuromatico's results are wrong:
    "polish off" - Google Search
    1613889726150.png

    The results based on the terms input by neuromatico ("polished off * book".) are only 26 and refer mostly to a novel with the title "Polished Off".
     

    rrose17

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    E come si traduce invece in questo contesto?
    Si è fatto fuori da solo, nel senso che si è rovinato e si è fatto cacciare grazie alle sue azioni (e non per volere altrui).
    Sorry but this isn't really a context. Could you give us a complete sentence since there are many ways to express this.
    He brought about his own downfall or He brought it on himself are two but hard to know for sure without more info.
     

    Aryetti

    Senior Member
    Italiano - dialetto veneto :D
    Sorry but this isn't really a context. Could you give us a complete sentence since there are many ways to express this.
    He brought about his own downfall or He brought it on himself are two but hard to know for sure without more info.
    Il contesto è che sto parlando con un amico e gli dico che un utente, prima che potessi buttarlo fuori da un gruppo in cui stava dando fastidio, "si è fatto fuori da solo" scrivendo le parolacce che autoespellono chi le scrive:
    - avevo già perso la pazienza ma non ho neanche dovuto buttarlo fuori, si è fatto fuori da solo.
     
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    Bookmom

    Senior Member
    There are so many ways to express this from a very businesslike tone to a more vulgar one. Here are a few: He did himself in/He got himself removed/thrown off/thrown out/booted out/kicked off/:warning:shit canned...
     
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