far more probably/possibly/probable to be Americans

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EdisonBhola

Senior Member
Korean
In my son's homework is this sentence where there are three choices:

The people that you see in Korean pubs are more probably/possibly/probable to be Americans rather than Europeans.

I think the correct option should be "probable" since an adjective is needed in that position. (be + more + adjective).
But the model answer is "probably". Do you think the author made a mistake?
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    None of them is correct, in my opinion. I would have thought "likely."

    Apparently, the test people think it should be this:
    The people that you see in Korean pubs are more probably to be Americans rather than Europeans.

    Not good. Perhaps someone is thinking you can interchange "probably" and "likely."
     

    EdisonBhola

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Even if we insert "likely" there, isn't it still an adjective and therefore "probable" is correct even though it sounds strange?
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I don't get into discussions of parts of speech, but "likely" as an adverb means "probably" (which may be where the original confusion comes in).

    This would be my sentence:
    The people that you see in Korean pubs are more likely to be Americans than Europeans.
     

    EdisonBhola

    Senior Member
    Korean
    I don't get into discussions of parts of speech, but "likely" as an adverb means "probably" (which may be where the original confusion comes in).

    This would be my sentence:
    The people that you see in Korean pubs are more likely to be Americans than Europeans.
    So "likely" in this sentence is an adverb? I really cannot tell what it is because the structure is so complex.
     
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