fare dodging blitz

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Dunno123

Senior Member
Slovak
Hello. I've seen this word several times in news and I am not sure what it means / conveys.

For example in connection with fare dodging:
1) Forty five train passengers have been fined nearly £30,000 following a fare dodging blitz.
2) All thirty three offenders were sentenced during a fare dodging blitz at Bristol Magistrates’ Court on Wednesday, September 12.

3) Caroline Lavender recalls the emotional fallout from a fare-dodging blitz that led to her son being threatened with a criminal record.

The definitions for "blitz" I found in dictionaries don't make sense here. In the first sentence I thought it could mean something like "police raid" which is similar to one of its definitions in a dictionary ("an intensive or sudden military attack"), but I am not sure and it wouldn't work in the other two sentences.

Or another definition: "a sudden, energetic, and concerted effort, typically on a specific task" - I don't think this definition describes anything similar to the activity of fare dodging.

Thank you in advance for your help.
 
  • AnythingGoes

    Senior Member
    English - USA (Midwest/Appalachia)
    Or another definition: "a sudden, energetic, and concerted effort, typically on a specific task" - I don't think this definition describes anything similar to the activity of fare dodging.
    The blitz in question was an intensive enforcement action by the police.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    In all three cases, "fare dodging blitz" means "a blitz against fare dodging".

    Does that help, Dunno123?
     

    Dunno123

    Senior Member
    Slovak
    Thank you for your answers. I think I understand it now. It is used figuratively and sort of likens the action to a military attack which is the original meaning of the word.

    In the article that contains the 3rd sentence the police themselves are not involved, but it talks about the family receiving letters threatening prosecution from Transport for London and then the arrival of a court summons, so it makes sense too.
     
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