Fare la pazzia di andare

kyuchek

Member
Italian
Hello everybody! There's a band going on their first musical tour to Japan and they express it in a very bad, spoken Italian, using the following sentence: " Con l'occasione abbiamo fatto la pazzia di andare a suonare in Giappone per la nostra prima volta". It wasn't something crazy, because they had a successful tour, and it was scheduled in advance. I don't know how to translate it.
Could it be correct to translate it this way: "With the occasion, we went mad / we went nuts for our first tour in Japan?
Thank you in advance
 
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  • kyuchek

    Member
    Italian
    Dear RRose17, you're right, but without wanting, I've sent the thread before finishing to write it. Now I've just edited it.
    Sorry :oops:
     

    rrose17

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    Maybe something like
    With the chance to play in Japan for the first time we went (absolutely) nuts/ (completely) bonkers/(over-the top) crazy.

    FYI mad meaning crazy is much more BE.
     

    Pietruzzo

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Con l'occasione abbiamo fatto la pazzia di andare a suonare in Giappone per la nostra prima volta". I
    As far as I can understand they are saying that going to play in Japan was a crazy/hasty thing to do at the time (but they did it anyway). It's not clear what "l'occasione" refers to. Could you post the previous sentence?
     

    Paulfromitaly

    MODerator
    Italian
    As far as I can understand they are saying that going to play in Japan was a crazy/hasty thing to do at the time (but they did it anyway). It's not clear what "l'occasione" refers to. Could you post the previous sentence?
    I agree, the sentence is unclear and the translation makes very little sense to me.
     

    Odysseus54

    Mod huc mod illuc
    Italian - Marche
    I think a close translation could be

    "... we went out on a limb and went to Japan to play for the first time"

    "Fare la pazzia", the way I understand the idiom, is not about going crazy, bonkers etc. about something, but rather taking a risk by doing something unusual, or intrinsically hard to accomplish, or not quite prudent, etc.

    "Ho fatto la pazzia di comprarmi una macchina nuova" (I have no money, how am I going to pay for it?)
    "Ho fatto la pazzia di chiamarla" (she is beautiful, and rich, and married, why would she want anything to do with me?)
    "Ho fatto la pazzia di licenziarmi" ecc.ecc.
     

    Paulfromitaly

    MODerator
    Italian
    "Fare la pazzia", the way I understand the idiom, is not about going crazy, bonkers etc. about something, but rather taking a risk by doing something unusual, or intrinsically hard to accomplish, or not quite prudent, etc.
    Exactly, that's why the OP's translation doesn't make any sense.
    "We were foolish/reckless enough to go..."
     

    Odysseus54

    Mod huc mod illuc
    Italian - Marche
    Exactly, that's why the OP's translation doesn't make any sense.
    "We were foolish/reckless enough to go..."
    That seems to suggest that something went wrong, though, at least to my ears. I think the original is more neutral.

    Another possible translation :

    "We were/went crazy and jumped at the opportunity to go to Japan etc."

    I am not sure about 'jumped at etc.', more context would help.

    It could be "Given the opportunity, we were crazy and did our first tour.."
     
    The meaning of the Italian sentence is "we dared going to Japan for a tour for our first time". The stress is on the challenge, not on the enthusiasm/excitement.
    Indeed "fare la pazzia" in Italian is stronger than the equivalent "to dare". I don't know how to turn this in English. Maybe "we absolutely dared going..."
     
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    Tellure

    Senior Member
    Italian

    lentulax

    Senior Member
    UK English
    As suggested by the sycophantic interview quoted by Tellure (and later 'Then you crazy bunch took off for Japan'), it is part of the image cultivated by many such groups that they are creatures of impulse , they do things just for the hell of it, who cares about reason, common sense,reality, money - they want to do something, they do it. The fact that the venture was carefully planned and even risk-free is irrelevant - publicity and reality rarely coincide. In fact, the reply to 'Then you crazy bunch took off for Japan', is something like 'Yeah, it's something I'd dreamt of for thirty years'. So , as Pietruzzzo says, 'we were crazy enough to ...' - that's the kind of guys we are!
     

    Tellure

    Senior Member
    Italian
    As suggested by the sycophantic interview quoted by Tellure (and later 'Then you crazy bunch took off for Japan'), it is part of the image cultivated by many such groups that they are creatures of impulse , they do things just for the hell of it, who cares about reason, common sense,reality, money - they want to do something, they do it. The fact that the venture was carefully planned and even risk-free is irrelevant - publicity and reality rarely coincide. In fact, the reply to 'Then you crazy bunch took off for Japan', is something like 'Yeah, it's something I'd dreamt of for thirty years'. So , as Pietruzzzo says, 'we were crazy enough to ...' - that's the kind of guys we are!
    Sono d'accordo. Un altro esempio:
    I’m grateful for the career we’ve had, but I’m mad enough to think we can still hit new levels.
    https://www.glasgowtimes.co.uk/news/17935810.simple-minds-play-hydro-glasgow-part-world-tour/

    Qui Jim Kerr dei Simple Minds usa un termine più British, "mad" - come già detto - ma il concetto è sostanzialmente lo stesso.
     
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