Farina di grani e pomodoro 100% italiani

Merlano73

New Member
Italian
Hello everybody!


I must translate the following sentence "Farina di grani e pomodoro 100% italiani".
The claim will be written on top of a food pack.

My 1st attempt would be:
"100% Italian flour from Italian grains and tomato".

If I respect the word order of the Italian sentence (1st farina - 2nd pomodoro) it seems to me that tomato is a bit too far from 100% Italian.
I was alternatively thinking on inverting word order (1st pomodoro - 2nd farina), thus obtaining something like:
"100% Italian tomato and flour from Italian grains".

I would love to hear from natives’ opinions/thoughts… better solutions!

Thank you!

M
 
  • Starless74

    Senior Member
    Italiano
    Ciao,
    do per scontato che in questo caso per "grani" si intendano diverse varietà di grano/frumento (wheat) e non "granelli" (grains).
    Perciò, suggerirei: 100% Italian wheat flour and Italian tomato(es).
    A mio avviso, Italian va ripetuto per prevenire l'ambiguità di cui parlavi; ma è appunto solo la mia opinione.

    Ovviamente, attendi i "nativi" per tutte le rifiniture.
     
    Last edited:

    Merlano73

    New Member
    Italian
    Ciao,
    do per scontato che in questo caso per "grani" si intendano diverse varietà di frumento (wheat) e non "granelli" (grains).
    Perciò, suggerirei: 100% Italian wheat flour and Italian tomato(es).
    A mio avviso, è il caso di ripetere Italian per prevenire l'ambiguità nell'origine dei prodotti di cui parlavi. Ma è solo la mia opinione.
    Ovviamente attendi i "nativi" per le rifiniture.
    Grazie Starless.
    Corretto! Wheat!
     
    Paul,
    l'originale è succinto, ma sta a significare che l'origine dei due ingredienti è 100% italiana.
    Certo, il significato è chiaro, ma il modo in cui è scritto non brilla per stile :)
    Come è scritto in italiano, significa che i grani usati sono coltivati in italia, non che le farine sono prodotte in italia. Se così fosse, non ci sarebbe alcun bisogno di una frase del genere, basterebbe "farine e pomodori 100% italiani".
     

    theartichoke

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    Hi Merlano,

    This seems like asking for the obvious, but could you let us know what this product is? Is it a box containing a bag of flour and a tin of tomatoes? A frozen pizza where flour and tomatoes are two of the ingredients? I'm thinking maybe "Flour and tomatoes both 100% Italian", but it sounds a bit odd, and it might help to know what we're describing!
     

    metazoan

    Senior Member
    US English
    Perciò, suggerirei: 100% Italian wheat flour and Italian tomato(es).
    A mio avviso, Italian va ripetuto per prevenire l'ambiguità di cui parlavi; ma è appunto solo la mia opinione.
    Yes, although the meaning would be equally clear omitting "wheat" and the second "Italian".
     

    Passante

    Senior Member
    italian
    Hi Merlano,

    This seems like asking for the obvious, but could you let us know what this product is? Is it a box containing a bag of flour and a tin of tomatoes? A frozen pizza where flour and tomatoes are two of the ingredients? I'm thinking maybe "Flour and tomatoes both 100% Italian", but it sounds a bit odd, and it might help to know what we're describing!
    Question: If I say 'Wheat flour and tomatoes 100% Italian' what do you understand?
     

    theartichoke

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    Question: If I say 'Wheat flour and tomatoes 100% Italian' what do you understand?

    That both the flour and the tomatoes were grown / produced in Italy. And assuming that this phrase was on a product containing ingredients other than flour and tomatoes, I'd think it was implying that the other ingredients might not be Italian.

    There might be a bit of a cultural issue here, too, at least from a Canadian standpoint. I've noticed in Italy and other European countries that there's a lot more attention, on supermarket labels and elsewhere, to the national origin of ingredients in food. Much of what is sold here, by contrast, simply states the country where the product was made, and sometimes not even that. It makes it harder to come up with an idiomatic translation of farina di grani e pomodoro 100% italiani when you rarely see the English equivalent.
     
    I've noticed in Italy and other European countries that there's a lot more attention, on supermarket labels and elsewhere, to the national origin of ingredients in food.
    That's precisely the point, and for a good reason.
    For example, Italian olive oil is known worldwide.
    If olive oil producers were all fair and honest, there would be no need to be so finicky with food labelling, but unfortunately they are not.
    So what happened was that some producers would buy second rate olives from other countries and then label their olive oil as "olio ecxtravergine di oliva italiano" because the olive oil was produced in Italy, leading customers to believe that also the olives were Italian.
     

    theartichoke

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    If olive oil producers were all fair and honest, there would be no need to be so finicky with food labelling, but unfortunately they are not.
    So what happened was that some producers would buy second rate olives from other countries and then label their olive oil as "olio ecxtravergine di oliva italiano" because the olive oil was produced in Italy, leading customers to believe that also the olives were Italian.

    Oh, I know.:) Here you'll find bottles of olive oil with the Italian flag, etc. on them, and when you go looking for the tiny print, it will say "Packed in Italy," with no information about where it was produced. It can't, however, say "Made in Italy." (This used to be legal, if I recall correctly.) I particularly dislike the products that are labelled only "Imported by..." with the name of some Canadian importing company on them, and no information about where it was imported from. Who cares who imported it?!
     
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