Faroese: The Aspiration Conundrum - Part 2

kemocon

Member
Arabic - Egypt and Standard
Are preaspirated consonants (post)aspirated as well? Or are there different cases based on where the consonant occurs, etc.? Let's take eitt as an example. How would a native speaker of Faroese pronounce it, [aiʰtːʰ] or [aiʰtː̚]? I previously started a thread similar to this one on Icelandic.
 
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  • Magb

    Senior Member
    Norway, Norwegian
    I found this description of specifically Faroese preaspiration: http://www.lingfil.uu.se/personal/petur/pdf-filer/0868.pdf

    I don't think it answers your question about postaspiration on preaspirated consonants, but I read through it quickly, so I may have missed it. What it certainly does show is the very interesting fact that some Faroese people use preaspiration on ungeminated medial fortis plosives following non-close vowels, e.g. bátur "boat" = [pɔaʰtʊɹ]. However, there may be both individual and regional variation involved.

    There's been a ton of research on postaspiration in North Germanic languages. I hope this doesn't come off as being off topic, but it feels necessary to point out that the dialect of Gräsö in Sweden has been demonstrated to have precisely what you're talking about: preaspiration and postaspiration on the same segments: http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&sour...E_yUEBWATCP1AgPhA&sig2=EiYQ5oZKpq_zfqTTbeIc8A
     

    kemocon

    Member
    Arabic - Egypt and Standard
    I found this description of specifically Faroese preaspiration: http://www.lingfil.uu.se/personal/petur/pdf-filer/0868.pdf

    I don't think it answers your question about postaspiration on preaspirated consonants, but I read through it quickly, so I may have missed it. What it certainly does show is the very interesting fact that some Faroese people use preaspiration on ungeminated medial fortis plosives following non-close vowels, e.g. bátur "boat" = [pɔaʰtʊɹ]. However, there may be both individual and regional variation involved.

    There's been a ton of research on postaspiration in North Germanic languages. I hope this doesn't come off as being off topic, but it feels necessary to point out that the dialect of Gräsö in Sweden has been demonstrated to have precisely what you're talking about: preaspiration and postaspiration on the same segments: http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&sour...E_yUEBWATCP1AgPhA&sig2=EiYQ5oZKpq_zfqTTbeIc8A
    Curious. Thanks, Magb, that was really helpful.
     
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