fascinating places

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quietdandelion

Banned
Formosa/Chinese
This guidebook will help you discover fascinating places to go and exciting things to do.


I'd like to make sure if I paraphrast "fascinating places" right; is it "inviting/charming/fancy places?" Thanks.
 
  • Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    This guidebook will help you discover fascinating places to go and exciting things to do.


    I'd like to make sure if I paraphrast "fascinating places" right; is it "inviting/charming/fancy places?" Thanks.
    "Charming", perhaps (depending on one's proclivities). "Inviting" and "fancy", no. Swimming with sharks on the Great Barrier Reef might be fascinating but certainly not "inviting" or "fancy".
     

    Prairiefire

    Senior Member
    US (Midwest) - English
    Do you want a shorter word, or a more specific word? In what way do you want the alternative word to be different?
     

    Prairiefire

    Senior Member
    US (Midwest) - English
    OK. 'Fascinating' means 'very interesting' or 'engrossing.' Other words (each has a slightly different connotation) include arresting, bewitching, captivating, engaging, riveting, spellbinding, and intriguing.

    Fascinating always has a connotation of engaging your mind (as opposed to just making you relax or have fun), and it has a pleasant connotation. Dimcl must know someone who enjoys risk and danger if he thinks someone would call swimming with sharks 'fascinating.' I would find watching professionals swim with sharks fascinating; I would find swimming with sharks myself terrifying.
     

    Harry Batt

    Senior Member
    USA English
    In order to survive a life style which employs advertising that pays little or no attention to grammar or definitions it is best to take their huckster language with a tonge in cheek. Fascinating, for example, is just about out of gas. Yes, swimming with sharks is fascinating by one measure, yet bird watching can be fascinating.
     

    quietdandelion

    Banned
    Formosa/Chinese
    In order to survive a life style which employs advertising that pays little or no attention to grammar or definitions it is best to take their huckster language with a tonge in cheek. Fascinating, for example, is just about out of gas. Yes, swimming with sharks is fascinating by one measure, yet bird watching can be fascinating.
    Thanks, Harry, for amusing and instructional info, I believe.
    Nevertheless, most of it is Greek to me. Could you paraphrase the underlined parts for us so that we could learn more?
    By the way, I find what you described is way way far more fascintaing than my thread.
     

    Harry Batt

    Senior Member
    USA English
    The underlined parts mean that advertising uses the English language in any manner that hooks the reader into buying something. That is huckster language. Eg., I have been plainly disgusted with lawyers advertising that injured individuals need to see a lawyer in order to "know their rights." This is plain nonsense. Now with this fascinating expression, the ad men have used it too often for so many fascinating things or activities that it has almost lost its real meaning; ie., it is out of gas. You can find that nearly everything is fascinating--the terror of swimming with sharks--or bird watching--the fascination of watching adult swallows teaching their fledglings how to fly like Spitfires to catch bugs on the wing. Fascination is measured or defined in the eye of the beholder.
     

    camaysar

    Senior Member
    usa
    usa, english
    Hi!

    In sympathy with Harry, not all places we may enjoy seeing will be "fascinating"... we may not ooh and ahh upon visiting them. I'd tone it down to the good ole "interesting"... unless, that is, this is a guide book that really does specialize in allegedly "fascinating" places... or if you visited every destination in the book and found them all "fascinating". Now.... about those "exciting" things to do...!!!
     

    quietdandelion

    Banned
    Formosa/Chinese
    Thanks, Harry and camaysar, for the paraphrase and extra info.
    I've read them so many times and finally understood them. Then, I wonder why post 8 is so difficult to understand than most of the posts that I've read in this forum. (It may not be so for native speakers.) Here I venture my guess: there are a few slangs, which are uncommon, and I couldn't find them in my dictionary.
     

    camaysar

    Senior Member
    usa
    usa, english
    Yes, QD...

    Dictionaries may help you with "huckster", but you will need a book of (American) slang expressions to deal with "tongue in cheek" and "out of gas".
     

    digitig

    Member
    UK English
    Yes, QD...

    Dictionaries may help you with "huckster", but you will need a book of (American) slang expressions to deal with "tongue in cheek" and "out of gas".
    "Tongue in cheek" you should find in a book of British slang expressions too, but not "out of gas" (although we have enough exposure to US English to be able to work out the metaphor).
     
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