fashionable food

takashi0930

Senior Member
Japanese
Is "fashionable" used not only for fashion but also food?
If not, what's the more appropriate adjective to describe food which are elegant and pleasing to the eye? Fancy? (But the foods I mean are not necessarily expensive.)
Exaples:
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-5TKrjejxP8U/VYI1hxZGuWI/AAAAAAAAF_o/9EGW7GIp_TY/s1600/IMG_2282.JPG
http://a248.e.akamai.net/f/248/9510/1h/www.ozmall.co.jp/birthday/recipe/friend006/images/cheffood_pho.jpg
http://up.gc-img.net/post_img/2015/08/FnrAS66IryNswn7_h7iK2_109.jpeg
 
  • GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    "Fashionable" can apply to anything that has "fashions", including clothing, hairstyles, cosmetics, food, drink, music, and places to go on vacation.

    However, "fashionable" does not mean "something that is elegant and pleasing to the eye." Kale and quinoa, for example, are examples of "fashionable" foods today, but neither one is particularly elegant or beautiful. Your pictures may show nicely presented food, but unless everyone is serving (or wanting to serve) that same food today in order to be thought up-to-date, there is nothing "fashionable" about the items shown.
     

    waltern

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    "Fashionable", "elegant", "fancy", and "pleasing to the eye" can all be used to refer to food - however, they each have different meanings.
     

    takashi0930

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    I don't mean "very popular at a particular period in time". As I wrote earlier, I mean "elegant and pleasing to the eye". I'm looking for an adjective that means that, if any. It has nothing to do with a trend.

    Oh, I didn't know "spiffy" was old-fashined. I won't use it then.:)
     

    takashi0930

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    >waltern
    Hmmm... I think what I'm looking for is "beautiful + tasteful". If there's no such adjective, I'll give up. Thank you, everyone.
     

    meijin

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Hi, what is the Japanese word you're trying to translate into English? By any chance, "oshare"? (Oshare means "fashionable," "stylish," "dressy" etc. and is usually used for clothes, furniture, etc. but we do use it for food as well, don't we?)
    If so, these are all oshare foods and maybe native English speakers can let us know the best adjective to describe them.
    Oshare foods (Google search results)
     

    meijin

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Should have clicked the link You little ripper posted first. Yes, I think "elegant" is the best word for it.
     

    takashi0930

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    >YLR Thanks.
    >Meijin Thanks, but this is an "English Only" forum. We shouldn't write a Japanese word here.
     
    Last edited:

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    I don't mean "very popular at a particular period in time". . . . It has nothing to do with a trend.
    In that case, you certainly do not want "fashionable" because that is exactly what "fashionable" means!!!

    You seem to be talking primarily about appearance; you could therefore say "beautifully presented food", or "elegantly presented food."
     

    takashi0930

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    >GWB
    Thank you. Yes, I'm talking about the appearance "plus a nuance". I've come to a conclusion that there seems to be no exact English adjective fot it.
     

    meijin

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Hi, I've come back to this thread to tell you that I now think the word you were looking for is indeed "fancy" (if we are talking about the same Japanese word). The word doesn't necessarily mean the food is expensive, although it can mean expensive-looking, in which case it is a perfect English translation for another Japanese word that is difficult to translate depending on the item (I've learned this in an ongoing thread of mine: high-class, classy, luxury).
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    Hi, I've come back to this thread to tell you that I now think the word you were looking for is indeed "fancy" (if we are talking about the same Japanese word). The word doesn't necessarily mean the food is expensive, although it can mean expensive-looking, in which case it is a perfect English translation for another Japanese word that is difficult to translate depending on the item (I've learned this in an ongoing thread of mine: high-class, classy, luxury).
    I like fancy food. :)
     
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