fatefully, it inspired confidence

ebrahim

Senior Member
Persian
"Reaction of this kind already occurred in the 1920s; fatefully, it inspired confidence that the author had no future in politics."

On Hitler's Mein Kampf, Albrecht Koschorke

Hi,
I've read the definitions of dictionaries for 'fatefully', but don't know how it assign a meaning to it when it comes at the beginning of a sentence.
How can one paraphrase 'fatefully' here?
 
  • ebrahim

    Senior Member
    Persian
    Please give us some context. What is the preceding sentence, for example?
    "At the same time, academic readers—if they even bother to subject themselves to what Hitler cooked up—uniformly note how boring, unoriginal, jargon-laden, stylistically butchered, embarrassingly rabid, and altogether ludicrous they find the text."
     

    bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    Something "fateful" is significant, meaning that it has a great effect, often in a negative manner. Guessing, I think that was the writer is intimating in that the idea that Hitler had little future in politics made him seem less dangerous to his readers or the general public at the time because they assumed that he would not be very successful politically.

    I can see how this is paralleled in other times and places: Currently, people who would have been expected to be political failures have surprisingly risen to great heights despite their own penchant for "boring, unoriginal, jargon-laden, stylistically butchered, embarrassingly rabid, and altogether ludicrous" statements.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    fatefully, it inspired confidence that the author had no future in politics."

    A wordy paraphrase might be:

    In a conclusion that history would prove to be wrong*, it inspired confidence that the author had no future in politics."

    * in a way that led to bad (fateful) consequences
     
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