Fatmagul pronunciation

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Bonjules

Senior Member
German
I know it should be 'Fatmagül', but anyway.
I am trying to figure out the last syllable.
Ok, it is not like the German -gül. Or the English 'gool'.
Is it like the German 'gil'?
Or something else?
Help!
 
  • Cagsak

    Senior Member
    I know it should be 'Fatmagül', but anyway.
    I am trying to figure out the last syllable.
    Ok, it is not like the German -gül. Or the English 'gool'.
    Is it like the German 'gil'?
    Or something else?
    Help!
    I have no idea about German pronunciation. It's pronounced as Gül in the song Gülpembe.
     

    _Ozgur_

    Member
    Turkish
    Go to Google translate web site: Google Translate
    Select Turkish as language in the left pane. Write Fatmagül in the left pane and hit the speaker icon on the bottom left corner of the left pane.
    You should hear how it sounds if your computer has speakers.
     

    Bonjules

    Senior Member
    German
    Thank you Ozgur and all the others!

    I wasn't looking for a German 'version' of the name, but how it sounds in Turkish.
    (I think to try to 'translate' names is silly unless they have well established equivalents in another language, like famous cities etc.)
    From what I hear it is surely not like the German 'ü' like in 'früh' ; rather it seems more like the German 'i' vowel, but not exactly.
    The 'g' also sounds quite unique.
    The whole 3rd syllable sounds to me somewhat like (in German sounds) -'jyii(l), although if there is an 'l' to be heard at the end I can hardly make it out.
    Thanks again!
     

    Rallino

    Moderatoúrkos
    Turkish
    Özgür wasn't suggesting a translation for the name. Google Translate has a pronunciation feature.

    In any case, I don't know where you heard fatmagül but the Turkish ü and the German ü sound the same to me.
     

    Bonjules

    Senior Member
    German
    Well, this is quite confusing. I did use the Google feature and, even though my auditory capacity is not the best any more I can say with some
    confidence that this does not sound like the German ü.
    This German Umlaut has the features as described in the Wiki article as far as the tongue goes (forward, arched high, partially compressing the airflow), but
    the lips are protruding forward, puckered - like trying to give a peck of a kiss- not sideways, compressed - like more going towards the 'i' or 'ii' as it sounds in the Google pronunciation of Fatma.... This is a fundamental difference and the article seems to not always commit itself clearly one way or the other, but says
    something like ...but can be protruding...
    maybe they are trying to mix in too many variations into one concept.
    More audio examples might shed some more light on the matter (or someone who is truly 'native' bilingual in both languages)
     
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