Favorite Words or Phrases

Discussion in 'Cultural Discussions' started by Jeremy Sharpe, Mar 26, 2005.

  1. eno2

    eno2 Senior Member

    El Hierro de Canarias
    Dutch-Flemish
    I love cognates in general and some cognates in particular. Like elucubrations.


    In English it has a very narrow definition. And is "obsolete"

    Antiloquesea (Spanish). Sounds nice, Isn't nice.

    παραλία
    playa

    p ...aa...aa

    That's where the life is.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 10, 2018
  2. velisarius

    velisarius Senior Member

    Greece
    British English (Sussex)
    Elucubrations? - That takes me back a bit. Good old Europe n° 1 :thumbsup:


    παραλία and παρά θίν' αλός :thumbsup::thumbsup:
     
  3. Red Arrow

    Red Arrow Senior Member

    Dutch - Belgium
    In Dutch:
    kamperfoelie (honeysuckle)
    flierefluiter (a careless person)
    boompje (a little tree)

    In Swedish:
    fjord
    två
    (two)
    lögn (lie)
    namn (name)

    In English:
    huge
    human
    bath
    (British pronunciation)

    In Bulgarian:
    флюс

    In Icelandic:
    fljótt (quickly)

    I really like certain consonant combinations, in particular /mp/, /mn/, /ŋn/, /fl/, /fj/, /flj/ and /çj/ :D
    I also really like the voiceless th and the a-sound in father.
     
  4. ilocas2 Banned

    Czech
    Serbian:

    čedomorstvo - murder of new born baby after birth
     
  5. Kotlas Senior Member

    Russian - Russia
    I like the way you can "juggle" words in English, creating meaningful sentences. I can't do this in my native language because it is highly inflected. But English is not, that's why it produces such neat phrases as this:

    "If you fail to prepare, you prepare to fail."
     
  6. eno2

    eno2 Senior Member

    El Hierro de Canarias
    Dutch-Flemish
    A bit late, I didn't get notice, but thank you for that. I'll use it in a thread elsewhere about elucuthings...
     
  7. Amapolas

    Amapolas Senior Member

    Buenos Aires
    Castellano rioplatense
    In Italian: dimenticare (forget). Love the combination of sounds and the cadence, the rhythm.
    Luckily, it's something I've learnt to do over the years. Memory is good, but not too much of it.
     
  8. eno2

    eno2 Senior Member

    El Hierro de Canarias
    Dutch-Flemish
    Very musical

    Non moi 'je ne regrette rien, rien de rien', mais j'oublie tout....:p

    Dementicare makes me think of dementeren in Dutch = suffer (from) dementia in English.

    The Italian word demente seems to be a true cognate
    Dement (Dutch)
    dément (French)
    demente Spanish
    Demented English
    demente Portugees

    -----

    La Catalina for 'the moon' in Spanish. A friend uses that word, I don't know where it comes from....
     
  9. L'irlandais

    L'irlandais Senior Member

    Dreyeckland/Alsace region
    Ireland: English-speaking ♂
    This has been discussed on WR previously, What are genders good for?
     
  10. eno2

    eno2 Senior Member

    El Hierro de Canarias
    Dutch-Flemish
    Thank you for that.
     
  11. Oddmania

    Oddmania Senior Member

    France
    French
    Very interesting thread! I would say my favourite words are encore ("Keep going..."), oublieux ("oblivious"), chérir ("cherish"), fantaisie ("fantasy") and météore ("meteor").
     
  12. tsoapm

    tsoapm Senior Member

    Le Marche, Italy
    English (England)
    I’m a big fan of heteronyms, basically words which are written the same but have different meanings with different pronunciations (that is perhaps not a watertight definition, but that’s the way I like to think of them, the ones that I like anyway). There’s a list of them in that Wikipedia article, but I had a nice time with a colleague coming up with them without such assistance. The one that always comes to mind is ‘entrance’/‘entrance’, also because the second is just a lovely word.
     
  13. Red Arrow

    Red Arrow Senior Member

    Dutch - Belgium
    I see now that this is not only about words that sound nice, but also about words that have fun or beautiful meanings.

    I find "Put a sock in it!" a fun expression in English. It gives me the image of a Brit actually putting a sock in his mouth :D

    In Dutch I like "Wie de bal kaatst, kan hem terug verwachten!" = Those who bounce the ball can expect it to come back
    Meaning: You reap what you sow
     
  14. eno2

    eno2 Senior Member

    El Hierro de Canarias
    Dutch-Flemish
    In het hol van Pluto (Dutch)

    Used for: (living or being in) an isolated location. Hol=cave

    In the cave of Pluto (=Cerberus, the Guardian of the Greek underworld at the southernmost tip of the European continent in Mani, Peloponnese)

    But it sounds even nicer when you know that 'hol' also means 'ass'…
     
  15. Red Arrow

    Red Arrow Senior Member

    Dutch - Belgium
    Oh yes, Holland = assland in Dutch.
     
  16. eno2

    eno2 Senior Member

    El Hierro de Canarias
    Dutch-Flemish
    :eek:

    -----

    'I have to believe that' is from Emmilou Harris...

    I also have to believe that...

    -----

    Pame Gi Allou
    George Dalaras

    I've been going to the beach for the last 22 years, daily....
     
    Last edited: Mar 10, 2018
  17. Red Arrow

    Red Arrow Senior Member

    Dutch - Belgium
    I can't say the Hungarian word "hogy" without smiling. What a beautiful word :)

    It means "that".
     
  18. Encolpius

    Encolpius Senior Member

    Hungarian
    Red Arrow, I think you would like more the word "on women" in Hungarian. Do you know how you say "on women" in Hungarian?
     
  19. Red Arrow

    Red Arrow Senior Member

    Dutch - Belgium
    I can't speak Hungarian, sorry, but it's nőken, isn't it?

    That reminds me of the Dutch expression "klaar is kees". Klaar is Dutch for ready, kész/kees is Hungarian for ready. Klaar is kees.
     
  20. Encolpius

    Encolpius Senior Member

    Hungarian
    It is rather nőkön. :)
     
  21. King Crimson

    King Crimson Modus in fabula

    Milano, Italia
    Italiano
    One such nice example in Italian would be the pair àncora (anchor) - ancóra (again, still); we could even create a small sentence using both terms: ancóra all'àncora (still riding at anchor).
     
  22. Encolpius

    Encolpius Senior Member

    Hungarian
    I've heard шушулка recently and fell in love wit it.
     
  23. eno2

    eno2 Senior Member

    El Hierro de Canarias
    Dutch-Flemish
    <Estoy aquí por estar
    Y la nieve sigue cayendo>
    Issa (maestro Zen)
     
  24. Amapolas

    Amapolas Senior Member

    Buenos Aires
    Castellano rioplatense
    I've fallen in love with this phrase that our friend Elcanario has chosen for his signature:

    Belief is a weak force, when it comes to moving mountains, gravity wins every time.

    By the great Terry Pratchett
     
  25. Elcanario

    Elcanario Senior Member

    En un lugar de Castilla
    Spanish - Spain
    Ahhh dear Amapolas, When I remember me reading Terry's books I always picture myself with an ear-to-ear grin and you know, the filthy lucre can't pay that bill. This thought makes me recall another memorable adage, poderoso caballero es Don Dinero, its author and the work that left me astonished, Gracias y desgracias del ojo del culo, dirigidas a Doña Juana Mucha, Montón de Carne, Mujer gorda por arrobas. Escribiolos Juan Lamas el del camisón cagado.
    I know, I know, strange train of thought. Sometimes I can't help it.
    :D
    Un saludo y felices fiestas.
     
  26. tsoapm

    tsoapm Senior Member

    Le Marche, Italy
    English (England)
    I was just looking at the word ‘compliant’: I know that it’s really formed from the verb ‘comply’, but at a glance you might break it down as com- + ‘pliant’, which is semantically quite different, but ends up not being entirely unrelated all the same. That’s nice.
     

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