Favorite Words or Phrases

eno2

Senior Member
Dutch-Flemish
I love cognates in general and some cognates in particular. Like elucubrations.


Définitions : élucubration - Dictionnaire de français Larousse
www.larousse.fr/dictionnaires/francais/élucubration/28472
Vertaal deze pagina
Production déraisonnable, absurde, issue de recherches laborieuses ; divagation, extravagance : On ne peut pas prendre au sérieux ses élucubrations.
In English it has a very narrow definition. And is "obsolete"

Antiloquesea (Spanish). Sounds nice, Isn't nice.

παραλία
playa

p ...aa...aa

That's where the life is.
 
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  • velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Elucubrations? - That takes me back a bit. Good old Europe n° 1 :thumbsup:

    παραλία and παρά θίν' αλός :thumbsup::thumbsup:
     

    Red Arrow

    Senior Member
    Dutch - Belgium
    In Dutch:
    kamperfoelie (honeysuckle)
    flierefluiter (a careless person)
    boompje (a little tree)

    In Swedish:
    fjord
    två
    (two)
    lögn (lie)
    namn (name)

    In English:
    huge
    human
    bath
    (British pronunciation)

    In Bulgarian:
    флюс

    In Icelandic:
    fljótt (quickly)

    I really like certain consonant combinations, in particular /mp/, /mn/, /ŋn/, /fl/, /fj/, /flj/ and /çj/ :D
    I also really like the voiceless th and the a-sound in father.
     

    Kotlas

    Senior Member
    Russian - Russia
    Languages are very beautiful things, as we all know, and sometimes a phrase or word just strikes you as beautiful. So, post them here!
    I like the way you can "juggle" words in English, creating meaningful sentences. I can't do this in my native language because it is highly inflected. But English is not, that's why it produces such neat phrases as this:

    "If you fail to prepare, you prepare to fail."
     

    Amapolas

    Senior Member
    Castellano rioplatense
    In Italian: dimenticare (forget). Love the combination of sounds and the cadence, the rhythm.
    Luckily, it's something I've learnt to do over the years. Memory is good, but not too much of it.
     

    eno2

    Senior Member
    Dutch-Flemish
    Very musical

    Non moi 'je ne regrette rien, rien de rien', mais j'oublie tout....:p

    Dementicare makes me think of dementeren in Dutch = suffer (from) dementia in English.

    The Italian word demente seems to be a true cognate
    Dement (Dutch)
    dément (French)
    demente Spanish
    Demented English
    demente Portugees

    -----

    La Catalina for 'the moon' in Spanish. A friend uses that word, I don't know where it comes from....
     

    Oddmania

    Senior Member
    French
    Very interesting thread! I would say my favourite words are encore ("Keep going..."), oublieux ("oblivious"), chérir ("cherish"), fantaisie ("fantasy") and météore ("meteor").
     

    tsoapm

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    I’m a big fan of heteronyms, basically words which are written the same but have different meanings with different pronunciations (that is perhaps not a watertight definition, but that’s the way I like to think of them, the ones that I like anyway). There’s a list of them in that Wikipedia article, but I had a nice time with a colleague coming up with them without such assistance. The one that always comes to mind is ‘entrance’/‘entrance’, also because the second is just a lovely word.
     

    Red Arrow

    Senior Member
    Dutch - Belgium
    I see now that this is not only about words that sound nice, but also about words that have fun or beautiful meanings.

    I find "Put a sock in it!" a fun expression in English. It gives me the image of a Brit actually putting a sock in his mouth :D

    In Dutch I like "Wie de bal kaatst, kan hem terug verwachten!" = Those who bounce the ball can expect it to come back
    Meaning: You reap what you sow
     

    eno2

    Senior Member
    Dutch-Flemish
    In het hol van Pluto (Dutch)

    Used for: (living or being in) an isolated location. Hol=cave

    In the cave of Pluto (=Cerberus, the Guardian of the Greek underworld at the southernmost tip of the European continent in Mani, Peloponnese)

    But it sounds even nicer when you know that 'hol' also means 'ass'…
     

    eno2

    Senior Member
    Dutch-Flemish
    :eek:

    -----

    Martin Luther King: “The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends towards justice.” I have to believe that.
    'I have to believe that' is from Emmilou Harris...

    I also have to believe that...

    -----

    Pame Gi Allou
    George Dalaras

    I've been going to the beach for the last 22 years, daily....
     
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    Red Arrow

    Senior Member
    Dutch - Belgium
    I can't say the Hungarian word "hogy" without smiling. What a beautiful word :)

    It means "that".
     

    Encolpius

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    Red Arrow, I think you would like more the word "on women" in Hungarian. Do you know how you say "on women" in Hungarian?
     

    Red Arrow

    Senior Member
    Dutch - Belgium
    I can't speak Hungarian, sorry, but it's nőken, isn't it?

    That reminds me of the Dutch expression "klaar is kees". Klaar is Dutch for ready, kész/kees is Hungarian for ready. Klaar is kees.
     

    King Crimson

    Modus in fabula
    Italiano
    I’m a big fan of heteronyms, basically words which are written the same but have different meanings with different pronunciations (that is perhaps not a watertight definition, but that’s the way I like to think of them, the ones that I like anyway). There’s a list of them in that Wikipedia article, but I had a nice time with a colleague coming up with them without such assistance. The one that always comes to mind is ‘entrance’/‘entrance’, also because the second is just a lovely word.
    One such nice example in Italian would be the pair àncora (anchor) - ancóra (again, still); we could even create a small sentence using both terms: ancóra all'àncora (still riding at anchor).
     

    Amapolas

    Senior Member
    Castellano rioplatense
    I've fallen in love with this phrase that our friend Elcanario has chosen for his signature:

    Belief is a weak force, when it comes to moving mountains, gravity wins every time.

    By the great Terry Pratchett
     

    Elcanario

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Spain
    I've fallen in love with this phrase that our friend Elcanario has chosen for his signature:

    Belief is a weak force, when it comes to moving mountains, gravity wins every time.

    By the great Terry Pratchett
    Ahhh dear Amapolas, When I remember me reading Terry's books I always picture myself with an ear-to-ear grin and you know, the filthy lucre can't pay that bill. This thought makes me recall another memorable adage, poderoso caballero es Don Dinero, its author and the work that left me astonished, Gracias y desgracias del ojo del culo, dirigidas a Doña Juana Mucha, Montón de Carne, Mujer gorda por arrobas. Escribiolos Juan Lamas el del camisón cagado.
    I know, I know, strange train of thought. Sometimes I can't help it.
    :D
    Un saludo y felices fiestas.
     

    tsoapm

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    I was just looking at the word ‘compliant’: I know that it’s really formed from the verb ‘comply’, but at a glance you might break it down as com- + ‘pliant’, which is semantically quite different, but ends up not being entirely unrelated all the same. That’s nice.
     

    Ballenero

    Senior Member
    Spaniard
    Hi there,
    These are some of my favo(u)rites words in English:

    Wavelength.
    I love its sound. It be a cause of the elegance.
    I have fun also because I have to stick my tongue out of my mouth to say it, same as:
    Strength.

    Temptress.

    There is a smile in your face at the end.

    Prompt.
    I pronounce it and my head moves up and down.

    Wolf.
    Effective. Round.
    King of animal names.
    Atavistic.
    'From a meet at night
    The beast's howl and the human voice
    Lost in the mists of time
    Already the barking dog'
     

    eno2

    Senior Member
    Dutch-Flemish
    As I don't like creation beliefs, theories and myths, I was happy to discover the word 'abiogenese' (Dutch) a few years ago, which means
    <het ontstaan van levende uit niet-levende substantie, spontane generatie= =autogenese, zelfwording..DVD>

    Abiogenesis
    , the idea that life arose from nonlife more than 3.5 billion years ago on Earth. Abiogenesis proposes that the first life-forms generated were very simple and through a gradual process became increasingly complex. Biogenesis, in which life is derived from the reproduction of other life, was presumably preceded by abiogenesis, which became impossible once Earth’s atmosphere assumed its present composition.
    abiogenesis | Definition & Theory

    Makes me think of Ancient Greek Spermatikos Logos and Latin Latin Generatio spontanea but that's not quite the same though:


    Although many equate abiogenesis with the archaic theory of spontaneous generation, the two ideas are quite different. According to the latter, complex life (e.g., a maggot or mouse) was thought to arise spontaneously and continually from nonliving matter. While the hypothetical process of spontaneous generation was disproved as early as the 17th century and decisively rejected in the 19th century, abiogenesis has been neither proved nor disproved.
     
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