fed back in to the loop?

Camlearner

Senior Member
Khmer
Hi

A quality management system may consist of policies and protocols to ensure that a service or intervention is optimally delivered and will incorporate indicators to demonstrate whether such success is being achieved, in the early, mid and end stages of an intervention or programme. Such indicators need to be reported and fed back in to the loop so that quality improvements can be made continually.
What does this phrase fed back in to the loop here mean?

Thanks

Source: http://www.healthknowledge.org.uk/public-health-textbook/research-methods/1c-health-care-evaluation-health-care-assessment/principles-evaluation
 
  • dn88

    Senior Member
    Polish
    This example might be a bit scientific but maybe it will help.
    In Control Theory, a closed-loop feedback control system measures the current output which is then "fed back into the loop", usually by substracting the measured value from the input, in order to obtain the desired output.
    By analogy, in this case we have some indicators that are "measured" to assess the quality of the system. This quality is then compared to what it was supposed to be at the start so that changes can be made in the process itself to improve the overall "output" quality.
     

    Camlearner

    Senior Member
    Khmer
    Thanks dn88 for your help. But I can't understand the phrase completely yet. Maybe you explain another way that is more simple.
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I suppose that the "loop" referred to is something like this one: http://www.balancedscorecard.org/TheDemingCycle/tabid/112/Default.aspx

    This model recommends that businesses should constantly check how well they are performing by performing the four stages in turn - acting, planning, doing, checking, then back to acting (making an improvement in the process) again. "Reporting and feeding back into the loop" is presumably part of the "checking" process.
     

    Tegs

    Mód ar líne
    English (Ireland)
    To explain feed something back into the loop in a general-language, non-technical way, it means to report something (for example, a problem) to someone else in order that it can be improved or fixed. So, if you are working for a computer company, and you are testing parts of the computer, let's say you realise one part is not working properly. You report this problem to an engineer, who will then fix the problem. You could call this feeding the problem back into the loop
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Feedback, in general, is any output from a system that becomes an input to that system.

    For an example many of us can relate to, consider holding a microphone next to a speaker. When the speaker makes a sound, the microphone picks it up. It is amplified and comes through the speaker louder. The microphone picks up the louder sound, the speaker makes it still louder, and within a few seconds we have an ear-splitting noise.

    That sort of feedback is undesirable, of course. Whoever is holding the microphone moves away from the speaker quickly, or someone turns down the gain on the amplifier. However, sometimes feedback is desirable. A car's cruise control system monitors the car's speed. If the speed is below the set value, it sends more fuel to the engine, and the car speeds up. However, because the slope of the road changes, the relationship between fuel to the engine and vehicle speed also changes. Suppose the car now speeds up because it is going downhill. By feeding system output (speed) back into the system as input, the cruise control system can detect this and reduce engine fuel appropriately.

    In either case, the complete cycle of input-processing-output-input is called a feedback loop.

    What we have here is the same concept applied to people in business. The business does something that is supposed to improve quality: for example, it establishes a policy. It then measures quality to see if the desired results are being achieved. That information is fed back so the policy can be modified if necessary.
     

    morzh

    Banned
    USA
    Russian
    I think it is a feedback loop. A feedback can be applied to any system making it a regulated one, according to the loop's transfer function.
     

    Camlearner

    Senior Member
    Khmer
    Thanks morzh.

    Can you elaborate or explain more? I dont' fully understand yet your point :
    I think it is a feedback loop. A feedback can be applied to any system making it a regulated one, according to the loop's transfer function.
     

    morzh

    Banned
    USA
    Russian
    Any system (be it an electrical one, or your quality management one - does not matter), if it is well-controlled, it has to involve a so call "Negative Feedback Loop".
    The gist of it is this:
    You take the output, invert it, and feed it back to the input of the system via feedback loop. The system is so designed, so at the input that portion of the output and the input signal cancel each other. The system thus behaves according to the feedback loop characteristics.
    In other words, the input "knows" what the output is doing.


    In your case those "indicators" and the way they are produced are that feedback loop and its signal. They serve so the input of your system knows what the output is doing at every point of time.

    I suggest, if you are interested, go to Wikipedia and read about the "Negative feedback".
    Because people spend years learning that stuff in colleges. :) I did :) It is too much to explain.
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    One purpose of feedback is to regulate a system. An example is the automobile cruise control (speed control) system in my post #8. If the car is going too fast, feedback tells the system that the car is going too fast, and the system reduces fuel flow to the engine. If the car is going too slowly, feedback tells the system that, and the system increases fuel flow to the engine. The result is that the speed of the car is regulated.

    Any system can be regulated this way by adding feedback. That's true in theory. In practice, feedback is not always practical, especially in large, complex systems.

    The transfer function of the loop is a technical term. It means, in effect, that you may need to perform calculations as part of the feedback process. You must figure out how to use the output measurements as input. If the system adjusts the fuel flow to the engine too quickly when it senses a speed difference, the car will speed up, slow down, speed up, slow down and continue to do that forever. If the system adjusts fuel flow too slowly, the car will continue to slow down when it climbs a hill instead of maintaining the desired speed. Designing transfer functions is a complicated bit of engineering.
     
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